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Colour in darkness

There’s 3 things happening this week – Autism awareness week/day and month.

Possibly the most peculiar Autism Awareness Week/Month since their establishment but also the most unifying. We are all facing the same restrictions, the same stigma, the same fears and hopes. We deal and are affected in varying degrees and we are reminded that in times of darkness the world becomes just a little bit kinder.

Along with everything else this pandemic has shed light on, it has shown us how we all require a different approach/treatment. The kiddies need to stay home and still be educated, teens need to study at home and get used to online socialising, workers need to work from home or find ways to keep their cashflow, and the older generation needs to be protected, valued and provided for. In all these categories we have the people with underlying health conditions, mental health concerns, pregnant, disabilities, unemployed, homeless, ease of access to healthcare, childcare and autism.

This pandemic treats us all equally. Money, social status, friends, and being “normal” means nothing. We are faced with the reality of our own mortality and what that means individually for us. We are starting to open up and become aware of ourselves, appreciate what we have, respect others and give help where possible.

For this autism awareness month I want this to be a place where we can learn more, read about and become aware. We will expand our horizons, open up our worlds and come through this pandemic bigger, better, more inclusive, loving and respectful. I’ll find, share and maybe use some of my own stories to show you this pandemic from an autism point of view. And to counteract the bad, I will be offering up some of my paintings for sale, to raise funds for the SMILE school for autistic adults in Cyprus.

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Eternal Valentine

Love in an autism home means something different to the rest of the world. It means hassling your little bro for attention when he won’t play with you. It means finishing your homework and then doing his homework and speech therapy with him just so you can spend time together. Watching the same movie/scene over and over just to share experiences with him. It means staying up every night until he falls asleep first repeating his words. It means giving him all your tapes, toys, CDs, phones in the hope that it calms him down. It means running after him. It means making sure he is okay first.  

Love in an autism home is fierce and overwhelming. As a sibling, I learned at the age of 10 that my childhood, teens and adulthood weren’t my own. As the big sister I thought this little boy was going to adore me, follow me around and annoy me for the rest of my life. Instead, he flipped it all on me and made me the follower.

Love in an autism home breaks you apart and builds you back up. It takes control of every little bit of your soul – even the ones you don’t find out about until years later – and it makes every piece of you better. It gives you the highest highs and some lows far lower than I ever knew were possible.

Love in an autism home takes away your identity. Whoever you thought you were is gone and now you’re someone new. Someone capable of things you never thought of – strength, emotional intelligence, thinking beyond the imaginable. It forces you to love yourself.

Love in an autism home inspires fears bigger than anything you can imagine. I am crippled by the fear of something happening to me because what would happen to him? Who would understand him and give him what he needs? Will he have a home and will he be safe? My fears manifest in love for myself; taking care of me and being overprotective of my welbeing. It made me selfish when it comes to health and forced me to be prepared for any eventuality I can imagine.

Love in an autism home takes away your eyesight and gives you perception. It leaves you blind to egos and gives you uninterrupted vision to see beyond the visible. To dream big and look forward to a future that is waiting to be written by the struggle and fight and determination of autism families for autism families.

On this day I reflect on a life so full of love and I am so grateful for my eternal Valentine – my brother. I hope I get to spend all my lifetimes being inspired by you.

Happy Valentines, Galentines, Malentines, Palentines and Friday to all of you ❤

 

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My hopes for you and me

My 20s were full of love, laughter, crying, drama, fights, loses, wins, deal breakers, trips, transitions, degrees, decisions, heartbreaks, booze, dreams and so much more. Sometimes I wonder what your 20 would have been like if you were neurotypical. I wonder if we would still be a family, how close we would be and if I82233631_2531887710466115_4314041005243367424_n would worry about you. Would we hang out? Send cards? Meet on special occasions? Would our lives depend on each others?

Probably no. But for better or for worse, our lives are intertwined. We are close, I worry about you, we hang out, send cards and meet on special occasions. All these banal things take a completely different meaning but that meaning is ours – yours and mine.

To be honest, I am nowhere near where I thought I would be at 30 but I know where I’m going. I know where home is. I can make plans and dream big – I’m doing better. I spent my 20s chasing goals and worrying that I didn’t belong to one place or have a home but I’ve realised that anywhere with people is home – I have so many homes and that’s okay. You taught me that. In the last decade you have moved to 7 different homes, changed 3 schools and you were okay.

In my 30s I have all I need and maybe that was the gold I was so desperate to find – not earning enough to support us both or having a high-stakes powerhouse job but being a powerhouse and strong enough to be okay with not being okay, being irresponsible to learn responsibility, being broken to become resourceful and being miserable to appreciating happiness.

My hopes for you are that you are happy where you are, with the people you are with. I hope that when you look at yourself you love you, and that when you don’t you can lean back into our love for you. I hope you continue living your life knowing that there are people around you who know you and can represent you and keep you safe. In return, I promise to be safe so that you always have a voice. I promise to live the life I have at this home away from you and always come home to you – for all the decades in my life and yours and beyond.

Thank you to everyone who has donated to Autism Support Famagusta over the last few weeks. I am aware of some tech issues but even if you were not able to donate, your intentions mean that you can out there instead and spread what you’ve learned like a kind of autism awareness plague.

To donate: http://www.autismsupportfamagusta.com/donate

Thank you.

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Transformations: 2015-2016

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus – and it hosts my brother. 

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

img_2905In 2015 Autism Support Famagusta I wrote: “Their dream is to build a home within the community to provide care and a quality of life for people with Autism. The long-term goal is a specialised centre which will offer kids with Autism tailored education and pastime. This is going to start with them providing housing with 24-hour care for children, and adults with Autism.” 

And now here we are. The Smile centre is open and hosts 3 adults with interest from even more families.

In The time someone asked me for permission I explained that “I write the blog, post the videos and use personal information about my family, Christos and myself for Autism awareness… I feel that the problem of how Autism is perceived – being naughty or weird children – needs to be addressed within mine and my family’s lifetime so that i can ensure that my brother gets to live his life as happy as possible in case I am not here to make it happen.”

In honour of 100 posts I offered some random facts about Christos and I wrote about how it feels to miss someone like him.

For Christmas I explained to you how: “Christos doesn’t write Santa lists, he doesn’t get a new phone, or the latest game; he doesn’t want it. All he wants is the meal. The one where all of our insanely loud family sits around a table and eats until there is nowhere  else to put food except Tupperware to take home for the next couple of days. The one where my grandpa will say ‘Christo Cheers’ to him a million times and Christos will clink his glass a million and one times, because its Christmas and he knows that’s what we do on Christmas.”

I published in The Mighty , Autism Daily Newscast, Autism Parenting Magazine, Ant1.com.cy, Autism West Midlands – Autism Matters,

The highlight of 2016: The preparation of and response to #Project324 .

Today? Smile is making autism visible. Christos keeps teaching everyone around him about autism and pushing us to see the world from all kinds of perspectives – not just a few. I have witnessed my baby bro go from a kid who moved from town to town, school to school and home to home to an adult who puts others first, helps when he can, is compassionate, brave and funny. And that! is better than any resolution. And the best part is he’s my role-model; By loving him I never forget who I am supposed to be.

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Hear me roar (about autism): 2013-2014

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus – and it hosts my brother. 

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

After my graduation I was a bit lost. I didn’t know if I wanted to pursue a career in law, I isolated my self and spent most of my days on the couch or in bed. I had decided not to return home (to Cyprus) all the pursuit of happiness and love. Only, after three years of living away from home I still wasn’t any wiser re the happiness and completely lost about the love bit. One gloomy day, I was re re watching an old series when an episode about writing spoke to me. Coincidentally, I had a little run-in with blog writing at a temp job where I wrote a post about unemployment and the woes of being a law graduate in the state of today’s economy. The process, as well as the response, made me think this was destiny (I believed in destiny when I was 22, just like you did). So, I got out of bed and did some research. Ok I sat up in bed and did some research.

The blog tips I got from various internet sources, sitcoms and friends were “Be yourself”, “Spell check” and “Pick a theme, write about something you’re passionate about” – so what was I passionate about? Looking back now, it was so obvious and I don’t know why it took that long to find the answer. I was still learning about myself and crawling my way out of my own personal dark ages for the previous ten years so I had to dig deep and shed all the layers and masks I had on. One night, I was Skyping home and Christos was being a tiger on camera. After that I spoke to dad about the issues he was having at school. I hung up, cried and realised I’m passionate about him and his future. Destiny (i thought) struck again when I read a guest blog article on BBC about how autistic children are presented with special jargon phrases. Mark Neary captured it completely; it made me laugh out loud and at the same time gave me the courage to create this page and write my first post .

199123_10150167935090030_1697873_n (1)The next two years where a blur. The blog took off in a way that I never expected and so did I. I had so much to say, share, relive, consider, reflect on and learn. Writing all this down made me cry every time. Suddenly, in two years I went from re re watching series in bed and avoiding my feelings to advocating for rights in Canada, Australia, France, the UK and writing articles about us in Greek, writing to MPs and governments around the world. I was approached by autism charities, organisations, radio stations, TV stations about my story (links to articles under Published tab on main page). There was no hiding anymore, no masks.

Writing became a regular thing. It got me out of bed, it made me think, it made me angry, it made me change things and perceptions around me. I had found my voice and the roar I had been suppressing was bursting out of me. My life was filled with people from all around the world who were going through the same thing I was, who wanted guidance, help or advice. People who had just gotten a diagnosis, or who didn’t know which therapy to go for, or parents who worried about how the siblings of the kid with autism would be affected. Writing about autism brought me the happiness I was looking for and it made me look at me in a different way. I knew so much more than I gave myself credit for. I had so much to give and the sadness and anger I felt transformed into inspiration and were channelled into this blog – which made a difference in other peoples’ lives but, perhaps more importantly it mended my ties with my family, and myself. I learned so much about myself through writing about Christos – yet another gift he has given me.

I published 52 posts on the blog in 2013/2014 and, today, this is my 201st post. On the second day of 2020 I won’t set any resolutions because it doesn’t matter what you think you want to do or what is expected of you – what you are is already you. So I am grateful for transformation my brother inspired in the last 21 years, I am thankful for all the friends we have around the world through this blog and I am more inspired than ever to continue advocating for this cause.

I hope you will join me.

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The girl with the Dora mask: 2011-2012

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and to counteract the selfish need to reflect on the last decade I will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus.

For more information: Smiling September

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

While the turmoils at home seemed to be neverending I thought that being away from it meant I was indestructible. I had started an LLM in a new city and it was intoxicating. In those years (my social years) I made friends for life, lost a few on the way but most importantly I found a way to not be me and it felt great. I was masking my sorrow with a mask no one knew about – not even me. Needless to say my social years didn’t last long – i’m a house cat at heart. So after too many jagerbombs, heartbreaks and too many late nights I buckled down, did the work and got my first masters. It felt like an accomplishment but not my own.

After this, I made the decision to stay in the UK permanently. It may sound selfish but I could never find out who I was in Cyprus; I was a child of divorce, sister to a boy with autism, wanted a career in law, but I didn’t even know basic things about myself; what food I liked, what music moved me or even how I liked to dress. Up until that point I was just faking being me trying to be the me I thought I was supposed to be.

So I cut ties with with all that, got a job and started working towards getting a training contract.

Today: I look at my brother who has lived his life so openly. No masks, no pretending – he has known who he is since the start. Who knows what mask he would be forced to wear if he was like us? What he would be forced to suppress/do just to fit in. So today, after years of mistakes and learning from my brother, i can proudly stand next to him without a mask. I don’t have peppers in my food because I don’t enjoy them, i don’t like horrors/thrillers, i prefer rain to sunshine and Pizza Hut to Dominos (that’s right), and I’d rather stay in all day and hang out with my bro (even though we annoy eachother) than go out into the world without him.

 

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Then and now: 2010

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and to counteract the selfish need to reflect on the last decade I will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus.

For more information: Smiling September

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

Hindsight is an incredible feeling isn’t it? I look back at who I was then and I can see clearly how I got to where I am. My last decade plays like a film in front of my eyes and at centre stage is Christos because there is nothing I am more proud of in life that to be his other half. To live up to his expectations every day, to earn and keep his trust, to walk beside him in life.

It wasn’t always my priority though. Even though he was the driving force behind my decision to move to the UK to study, my teens are a blur for the most part. See,  we all have ways of getting by and mine is that I block out parts of life/the past I don’t want to remember.

I was lost, looking for meaning, love, somewhere to belong and in a constant battle between the need to be selfish and take care of me and feeling guilty for not being selfless. But with the bad there was good and I’ll try to focus on those. Through all the family drama, heartbreak and late nights that consumed my 2010 there was light.

This picture is from Halloween 2010. Because, I don’t have any other pictures of me and my brother that year. It was a selfish year and but looking back, 10 years later, it had to be. There’s a part of my heart that will always be hollow with all the moments of Christo’s life I missed out on before he outgrew us all. But like any family unit, we have to take care of ourselves before we can take care of each other – we just didn’t know back then. Mum took him to a parade in Cyprus and he dressed as Woody from Toy Story, it was one of his favourite animation films. We watched it over and over and over, and knew all the words. I remember him asking to watch it and when Sid would come up he would hide. 

This year? We get to spend the entire day together in Sri Lanka, making memories and cementing our bond. The difference is that this is a selfless year. We have both overcome our individual obstacles and experiences that weighed us down – Christos has moved to a new school and is tackling issues bigger than him or us. He has paved the way for other families of kids and adults with autism to look forward to a future which doesn’t condemn them to sit on the sidelines of a society that doesn’t have money or time to invest in their abilities.

I’m not going to lie and say it’s been smooth sailing because we had a tough day yesterday. I travelled through 5 time zones in 3 days and it took its toll. The repetition of the routine and his need for everything to be the same is exhausting at the best of times. But today, we are both rested, we have a plan and we are back on track.