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21 and Atypical: Dancing with the Stars (aka Sisters)

Christina is Stephanos’ older sister and she shared this story with me earlier this week.

53423695_926770284324454_1836469629984178176_nWhen I was around 15 and Steph was 14 we used to listen to this song “I will survive” by  Gloria Gaynor and we used to just dance to it“. Christina is a year older than Stephanos and has loved dancing since forever. So , she decided to make up a choreography to the song and include Stephanos! Her many choreography stunts included lifting her little brother which she finds hilarious now as he is much bigger and taller than her.  They rehearsed it and danced to that song all the while sealing their sibling bond and creating memories that would last forever and would end up being shared on this blog, with you! As they got older and Christina moved to the UK for her studies their dance faded into their childhood. Christina remembers “after approximately 5 years, we were just sitting around with my mom and Steph listening to the radio when the song popped up! I looked over at him and said ‘Steph it’s our song!’ For a moment he looked at me like he was trying to process which song it was but when I stood up and positioned myself he immediately stood up as well and walked to the exact position he had to, to start off our choreography. I was so amazed by his memory. We started dancing to it again and of course half way through I forgot it but he remembered it all.” 

483721_10151540249360030_589832536_nFunnily enough, when I went home recently we were watching old home movies and going through old pictures and found videos of me and Christos dancing in our flat in our pyjamas. We would listen to same song repeatedly, switching off all the lights and run around with flashlights.

Growing up with a younger sibling with autism we couldn’t help but wonder if we can handle it, if they would ever speak, if we would ever be able to communicate with them. At first we were afraid, we were petrified and kept thinking we could never live with this diagnosis by our side. But, we survived. We look back at those years now thinking how we spent oh-so many nights just feeling sorry for ourselves, crying because we thought we’d crumble. Yet, we survived. We more than survived. We were pushed, inspired, lifted and moulded by them. We are us because of them.

As sisters we were tied to this dance even before we were born. But, and I’m sure Christina will agree, if we had a choice, 20ish years later and knowing all the things we know now, we would always choose to spend all our lifetimes dancing with Christos and Stephanos.

Read about more amazing sisters I have met through this blog here.

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An autism sister watching Atypical Season 2, Episodes 3-10

It took me a while to get through this season because it is so emotionally charged. It’s a bit too relatable for me.

Ultimately, I want you to watch it and see these 6 things.

1: In episode 3, Sam walks out of his class at some point due to sensory overload. The way he walks out reminded me of my brother. The eyes, the mouth twitching, the hand shaking, the urgency in his step. He walks out of that class as if his life depended on it. Sam has autism spectrum disorder. Keir Gilchrist, the actor, does not. Creating a single, accurate portrayal of living with ASD is impossible. Therefore, to create something relatable to as many people as you can you endeavour to make connections through different interpretations of ASD. It is a colossal credit to the people behind Atypical that Keir was able to remind little old me of my autistic brother in that scene. You can hear what he has to say about the show here, at Autfest 2018 hosted by Autism Society of America. In the same breath, we are introduced to an autism group with a range of individuals. These actors are all on the spectrum in real life. Again, they do not represent the entire autism community but they are there, on the screen with their own traits teaching all of us that autism has as many faces as the ‘normal’ cult. We see that they are honest, they have insecurities we can relate to and they care and look out for each other.

2: Doug and Elsa 44333001_353571598538233_179029183383470080_nare encouraged to promote awareness after an incident with Sam. I don’t want to state the obvious but that’s what i’m doing with this blog, that what we are going with the autism support group in Cyprus, that’s what my dad does with hiring people on the spectrum to work with. It’s not me being me when I say that our people are inspiring. As soon as they waltz into our lives they start tearing down walls, they press a reset button and draw a line between who we were and who we are meant to be. They push us out of our box, and pull us into unknown territory. They open our eyes and give us the gift of purpose.

3: Bullying. We experience Sam’s school life without Casey and although it is heartbreaking to see, watch and relate to we are also reminded that people outside our family have our kids back as well. It’s daunting for an autism family to let go and not be in control. It is nearly impossible to trust when it comes to them because of how cruel our society can be to anyone who is not neurotypical. We are reminded that they will have friends and foes wherever they go, and that their friends are capable of loving them and defending them as ferociously as we do. We experience more of the friendship between Zahid and Sam in this season. It is refreshing to see a portrayal of non-family members and how attuned they are to the needs of the person on the spectrum. It demonstrates the impact a neurodiverse person can have on everyone around them. Zahid gives as good as he takes in this friendship and when he feels he’s out of his league he calls in the big guns – Casey.

4: Sam explains that autism is not an accomplishment. It is not something he worked towards or something he has overcome. For neurotypicals it’s easy to think of someone’s progress as ‘overcoming’ their autism but that’s not an accurate observation or conclusion to make. Autism is something he was born with. Autism it’s part of his physical, genetic, cognitive and behavioural development as a person. He can’t overcome it, because he is it. To Sam, autism is like having fingers and toes. Think of it this way: Some people’s toes are long, some toes are longer than others, some are tiny. Some fingers bend to the left or the right, some have big nail  surfaces some barely have any. No two toes or fingers in the world are the same which means that there are 7.6 billion different pairs of toes in the world. Some people can bend make different shapes with their fingers, some can paint with their toes. Some are ambidextrous, some don’t have all ten.  Who’s to say what a persons abilities are based on their fingers and toes?

5: Casey – Which I talk about extensively here.

6: It is painfully obvious how immense and substantial the research was when the concept of Atypical was cooked up.  The crew, the directors, the writers and the actors show us in every single episode that they are trying to understand all the hundreds of layers that exist beneath the surface of an autism family. Every member is their own person. They don’t have the answers, they don’t do everything right because an autism diagnosis doesn’t come with a manual. Their characters are not superficially drawn up scripts that react to autism. Not all their decisions or actions relate to the person with autism. Each member is a complex human being, who struggles with their insecurities, their past, their future, their friendships/relationships, and autism. They are deeply relatable and painfully real.

Bonus tip: It’s so so worth watching.

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Sibling Dance

The unusually hot UK summer has come to an end  on Christos’ last day in the UK – and he has just finished shopping in Oxford Street, London.

40656487_243220489671717_1420749772490276864_n

The last week has been full of giggles and pleasant surprises. I am constantly amazed by how he has grown into a beautiful, mature adult with autism. And I am so grateful to our family for creating and sustaining this human who I can call my soulmate.

His basic schedule is simple – wake up, get dressed, eat, talk about when we will eat again, play his game boy, eat, talk about when he will snack, snack, talk about when he will eat again, talk about the schedule for the next day, talk about what we will eat the next day, eat, shower, tea, sleep. Anything out of this routine is discussed and it fits into the rest of the programme once agreed upon.

The fear of transport, restaurants and public spaces is not as big of an issue as it used to be. He will repeat what he wants to eat and drink and then he will patiently wait for the rest to finish. He adapts to change in plans and new environments like a pro. Like I said in my previous post it’s just the rest of us that stress out about all the above.

His maturity and adaptiveness is a credit to my mum, my dad and our grandparents. It is a credit to all our family how they love him, know him and praise him. The autism discourse used to focus only on the person on the spectrum, however it is their support system which moulds them and creates the adults that go off into society. We are seeing more and more studies and representation of parents and siblings of people on the autism spectrum and it would be naive not to include them in our journey to understanding autism.

Thing about soulmates is that we signed up to do this dance together even before we were born. If I had a choice now, 20 years later and knowing all the things I know, I would choose to spend all my lifetimes with him.

If you are into Netflix, Atypical Season 2 airs on Friday 07.09.2018. You can read my take on it here. If you’re in the UK, The A word delves deep into the family unit, together and individually. Each person is portrayed as a person. You can read my review here.

Tomorrow he travels back to Cyprus to resume the sleep, eat, repeat routine on home turf. Wish him a safe journey back and read something new about autism if you get a mo. I’ve gathered some articles below:

Schools ‘exclude autistic pupils through lack of understanding’

Bricks for autism: how LEGO-based therapy can help children

Autism: ‘If only I knew then what I know now’: Special school teacher Siobhan Barnett shares what working with autistic students has taught her about autism

Autism – five signs of autism spectrum disorder to look out for in children

‘Taboo’ autism seen as ‘disease’ in ethnic communities

How incy-wincy spider could show if your child is autistic

‘Autism and Learning Disability’ To Be A Priority in NHS England’s Upcoming 10 Year Plan

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The Sri Lanka Diaries

Christos, Dad and I are in Sri Lanka for 13 days. Note that this is the first time Christos has travelled without my mum. The prospect of travelling with an autistic adult who towers over both his father and sister was daunting. However, the only restless Pereras were the neurotypical ones. Christos cruised through the airport security, the airplane, the food, the transit and the overnight flight.

He adjusted to life in Sri Lanka just like a true traveller. All he asks is what the schedule is for the day. At our number one hotel we had a suite, a pool and 3 buffets. The staff were curious about Christos and keen to help in any way possible. By day two, everyone knew who he was. They knew what breakfast he liked and what ice cream he preferred. They even learned that ‘Efharisto’ means ‘thank you’ in Greek. Christos has no reservations when it comes to being in Amaya Lake. Even though it’s been 7 years since he last visited, he remembers it as if he has been there this whole time. His memory is impeccable.

The way of life, the culture is the first thing you notice when you get off the plane. Everyone is smiling, everyone wants to talk, help, and everyone stares. I can speak for Cypriots and Brits when I say that staring is not ‘polite’ and not encouraged. However, here it’s unavoidable. Staring here is not malicious because if you have an issue with someone you will sort it out immediately. Staring is education. It’s a revelation how little it bothers us here in comparison to Europe. The chasm between these two continents is evident in its people.

We talk about how lucky we are with Christo every day. There are families that can’t even dream about a vacation with autism. Yet, here we are. Talking to people who don’t know the word and explaining to them what this spectrum is all about. We are literally walking, talking, breathing awareness. Just by walking in a room Christos captures their attention, he evokes questions and he bestows new knowledge. This information will be talked about with friends, with family, and it will change someone’s life; maybe not here, maybe not now but one day.

I’ll go into the details of this adventure in later posts. For now, let me just remind you to respect and understand each other. We are only here for a limited time, and in that time we can make wonders happen. Remember that you may be the missing piece to a puzzle we all want solved.

Happy Holidays from the Pereras.

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Hope in Poo

(One of) my New Year’s resolutions was to read more non-fiction books. I just finished a book about Pablo Escobar and now I’ve moved on to a nurse’s recollection of what it was like to be a nurse in the 50’s.

Both post-war Colombia and post-war Britain made the current politics scene more real than ever. People had just gone through a wars that left thousands dead, they lived in fear for years and in the end they thought it would never happen again.

IMG_5933And then these guys come along. In times like these it’s easy to give up and it’s easy to overlook hope.

So, I’m going to start a monthly hope write up. This month’s hope can be found in poo. That’s right, our world is so effed up that we can now find hope in poo.

On the 23rd January, a study was published in the Microbiome Journal (here) which claims that Microbiota Transfer Therapy (Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), also known as a stool transplant, is the process of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy individual into a recipient) alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms. The investigation involved 14 days of therapy with oral vancomycin (an antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections) followed by a 12- to 24-hour fast (clear liquids only) with a bowel cleanse using MoviPrep (laxatives). On day 16, to repopulate gut microbiota (the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that literally share our body space), a high initial dose of standardized human gut microbiota (SHGM) was given either orally or rectally for 2 days followed by daily, lower maintenance oral doses of SHGM coupled with a stomach-acid suppressant for 7 to 8 weeks. The stomach-acid suppressant was used to increase survival of SHGM through the stomach. The children were followed for an additional 8 weeks after treatment ended.

What?

Basically:  18 patients aged 7 to 17 years who had ASD and moderate to severe GI problems were given antibiotics for bacterial infection followed by laxatives for 14 days. Then, they were administered a high dose of a range of microorganisms for 2 days. Followed by a lower dose of said microorganisms and stomach-acid repressants for 7-8 weeks; which helps the microorganisms survive longer.

ASD-related symptoms improved, as reported by the Parent Global Impressions-III (PGI-III) assessment, which evaluates 17 ASD-related symptoms, showed significant improvement during treatment and no reversion 8 weeks after treatment ended.

One of the many theories about where autism comes from has been the gut. That’s why we use gluten-free and casein-free diets as an alternative treatment. In “Best Food Critic in Town” I mentioned: Marilyn Le Breton, who explains:

“When you eat, the food you consume is broken down in your stomach. The bits that are not used by the body are flushed out as waste matter. In autistic people, the breakdown of two proteins present in some foods, gluten and casein, is not completed properly. The resulting fragments of these proteins are called peptides. Peptides are small enough to pass through the wall of the gut, rather than being processed in the normal way. As the peptides journey around the body, they make a pit stop at the brain, where they do untold damage before continuing their journey and finally making their way out of the body, via urine. Both are very similar to morphine, a highly addictive drug.”

What this study proves, on a small scale, is that perhaps cleaning the gut of neurodiverse people from the bacteria that the body does not keep in neurotypical people could be the one of the answers we have been looking for.

Hope.

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When Will We Learn?

I’m not going to write about the atrocity that was the US Election – here’s what i felt a year ago #Project324 Trump, Republicans and Disabilities, oh my.

I’m going to write about hope, the future. I’m going to remind you that you can change things, that you need to be strong in the face of racism, discrimination and unfairness. I’m going to ask you to take action, to not let this perversion become our legacy. I’m going to ask you to think about what world you want our kids to grow up in and what we can do right now to make sure they do.

Ambitious about Autism is an organisation i work with, they’ve put on projects like: #EmployMe for which I wrote –  What happens when you turn 18? UN International Day of Families for which I wrote – A letter to my autistic brother on his 18th birthday . Fun fact – I wrote this in 15 minutes and cried the whole way through, I haven’t read this since it’s been published. Maybe fun isn’t the word for it. Autism Friendly – Ambitious about Autism supported a London-based restaurant in winning the first of the National Autistic Society’s Autism Friendly Awards. Making the world Autism-Friendly Back to School – School Bells

Their latest is called #WhenWillWeLearn. The ambition is to make the ordinary possible for children and young people with autism. They provide services at schools and colleges, raise awareness and understanding and campaign for change. 

And they don’t give up. Their campaign asks you to write to your MP (if you are in the UK). Those of you outside the UK can write to your local authority, or you can write to me – I would love to forward your letter to our MPs, because it doesn’t matter where you live. A small change can resonate around the world – that’s the beauty of awareness, it doesn’t have borders. Sign up to show your support: ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/pledge-your-support or email me.

The campaign highlights that:
80% of children with autism experience anxiety every day about attending school;
45% had been illegally denied their right to a full education;
Over 1000 parents are forced to take legal action every year to get the support their child is entitled to;
42% of classroom teachers say their training doesn’t prepare them to meet the needs of children with autism; I wrote about this here.

So, please don’t give up. Because we have made a difference already; businesses introducing schemes to train people on the spectrum like Ford, Apple, Microsoft etc; stores introducing quiet hour to accommodate autism; TV shows are introducing characters on the spectrum; theatres/cinemas are catering for autistic youth; ‘neurodiversity’ is an official term and it’s all because of all of you, reading about autism and not giving up.

15007644_10154605350205030_2088488013_oI traveled to Venice on the 3rd November and, incidentally, it was also the day that Gatwick became an Autism Friendly airport. A ceremony was held but I didn’t know about it until later when i was stuffing my face with gelato and thinking about how much Christo would love it. The airport was presented with an award by the Chief Executive of the National Autistic Society to mark the achievement. Gatwick met a range of Autism Friendly criteria to help passengers, their families and carers, it has been praised for providing clear and accessible information for passengers about the airport and the assistance available to help plan for their journey. Staff have been specially trained to help assist autistic passengers and a hidden disability lanyard system has been put in place. HOW EXCITING. I wrote about Chris at the airport here. I know, I’ve referred to my own writings a lot in this post but it just goes to show that the information is everywhere, and it’s only a click away. So, click.

It’s up to us – we have to do this, we have to write, speak, call, email, visit, shout about all the things we want and by doing it for our own, we are doing it for everyone; one step at a time. Now, more than ever, we need to unite. We need to be one and we need to make our voices heard, because they did – so why can’t we? Now more than ever, we should recognise the power or the people. Because it was people that did this, and it will be people that change it.

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The end of Chapter 3

Earlier this week I found out that i have finally passed my Legal Practice Course; an LPC is the vocational stage of training to be a solicitor that must be taken after completing a law degree and before practicing. This means that after 8 years of being a law student, I am done. I was trying to describe to my friends how happy I was to receive the news and I couldn’t find words.

If you are a regular reader, you know that this was part of my life plan. I moved away from home, I’ve been studying since 2008 and working alongside my studies to set down the cornerstones of the life Christos will have to join eventually. This last month has been a tough one. My nan was in hospital for 3 weeks. My nan, or my 75137_10150101622680030_3087748_nyiayia, is a 2-time cancer survivor, she’s worked since she was 14 and she raised us all with such love. She loves a good sing-along, a western cowboy film, she knows how to throw a good party, she loves a good beer with her lunch and a whiskey on special occasions. She looks amazing; i know I’m biased but look at her! She always takes care of herself even though she worked 16-hour days, she never said no to a customer or an ill aunt, she was never too tired to run around after her grandchildren and I’m so proud of her – I used to borrow my yiaya’s jewelry and shoes, that’s how cool my yiayia is. She’s one tough cookie. I love my yiayia, she makes the best food, the best tea, toast and jam, she makes the best cakes (she owned a confectionery), she cries every time we speak and she rubs my feet even though hers are way more tired. I love my yiayia the most though because of how she treats Christo. I talk a lot about how our family felt after the diagnosis but my nan and granddad were right there with us. They went through all the emotions, all the ups and downs. They picked us up from school, babysat, they took Christo to speech therapy, to the oxygen chamber appointments, they watched the Lion King a thousand times, they picked up after  a tantrum, they always had a stash of calming treats, they stopped singing because he doesn’t like it and they never gave up on him. She has been a support to us and to Christo for as long as he has been with us. She knows his language, his schedule and how to bribe him for kisses and hugs. Christo knows he has to respect her, he knows which buttons to push and he knows that every time he says ‘yiayia’ she is ready to give him the world. I love the way they love him because it looks like the way i love him. It’s my only consolation, knowing he is loved that much every day I am not there.

By completing the course, I’ve ticked off a big box on my preparation list for our future. It’s something I have been working on for years, it’s the one thing I’ve worked so hard on, it’s what i will base the rest of my life on. And it’s done, it’s just there now waiting to be built on – waiting for me.

The end of the LPC is the end of the first big chapter in my life. 2 years of 4000 words every 10 days, 17 exams, sleepless nights, lots of wine, and lots of tears and it’s over. I breathe a sigh of relief before I move on, i take a moment to leave this behind and digest what it all means. In my head, everything i did was a step closer to the end game – the LPC was about 150,000 steps. I can look at my brother now with confidence, with certainty that we are going to be okay. I like to think that if he knew he would be proud, I like to think that deep down he knows. I can look back to when I left him to study in Lancaster and not be struck down by guilt; because after 8 years i did what i left him for. I think of all the birthdays i missed, all the tantrums, all the times he needed me and even though i can never go back and be there, it wasn’t all in vain.

Stay tuned for Chapter 4 of Life with the Pereras.