Sibling Dance

The unusually hot UK summer has come to an end  on Christos’ last day in the UK – and he has just finished shopping in Oxford Street, London.

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The last week has been full of giggles and pleasant surprises. I am constantly amazed by how he has grown into a beautiful, mature adult with autism. And I am so grateful to our family for creating and sustaining this human who I can call my soulmate.

His basic schedule is simple – wake up, get dressed, eat, talk about when we will eat again, play his game boy, eat, talk about when he will snack, snack, talk about when he will eat again, talk about the schedule for the next day, talk about what we will eat the next day, eat, shower, tea, sleep. Anything out of this routine is discussed and it fits into the rest of the programme once agreed upon.

The fear of transport, restaurants and public spaces is not as big of an issue as it used to be. He will repeat what he wants to eat and drink and then he will patiently wait for the rest to finish. He adapts to change in plans and new environments like a pro. Like I said in my previous post it’s just the rest of us that stress out about all the above.

His maturity and adaptiveness is a credit to my mum, my dad and our grandparents. It is a credit to all our family how they love him, know him and praise him. The autism discourse used to focus only on the person on the spectrum, however it is their support system which moulds them and creates the adults that go off into society. We are seeing more and more studies and representation of parents and siblings of people on the autism spectrum and it would be naive not to include them in our journey to understanding autism.

Thing about soulmates is that we signed up to do this dance together even before we were born. If I had a choice now, 20 years later and knowing all the things I know, I would choose to spend all my lifetimes with him.

If you are into Netflix, Atypical Season 2 airs on Friday 07.09.2018. You can read my take on it here. If you’re in the UK, The A word delves deep into the family unit, together and individually. Each person is portrayed as a person. You can read my review here.

Tomorrow he travels back to Cyprus to resume the sleep, eat, repeat routine on home turf. Wish him a safe journey back and read something new about autism if you get a mo. I’ve gathered some articles below:

Schools ‘exclude autistic pupils through lack of understanding’

Bricks for autism: how LEGO-based therapy can help children

Autism: ‘If only I knew then what I know now’: Special school teacher Siobhan Barnett shares what working with autistic students has taught her about autism

Autism – five signs of autism spectrum disorder to look out for in children

‘Taboo’ autism seen as ‘disease’ in ethnic communities

How incy-wincy spider could show if your child is autistic

‘Autism and Learning Disability’ To Be A Priority in NHS England’s Upcoming 10 Year Plan

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