#Project324 – Exception or Exceptional?

I find it really difficult to explain if awareness means making Autism the exception – which would include special learning methods, special units, training, etc; or if it means accepting that Autism is exceptional – and whether exceptional means rare/uncommon, or inspirational/remarkable.

Exception:

Making Autism the exception would include all the initiatives I have seen come into place these last few years. For example, Microsoft, Apple, BBC, Light it Up Blue, #EmployAutism, First Repondent training, police training, teacher training and the Israeli army which uses autistic volunteers to interpret complex satellite images. These organisations have put in place procedures, other than their usual, to accommodate individuals on the spectrum. Their training is tweaked to provide for sensory overload/deprivation, social abilities and employability. Is this the answer? Will awareness make Autism the exception? And if it does, will that force our global community to become more inclusive?

Will being the exception finally give Autism it’s place in our society?

It feels like a really roundabout and oxymoron-ish (yes, i made that up) way to make equality and inclusivity a reality.

So, a couple of new initiatives that have taken place this week – which make Autism the exception are:

  1. The Asda “Quiet Hour”: The Manchester branch is pioneering a ‘quiet hour’ in aid of autistic shoppers.The Asda Living store in Cheetham Hill is aiming at the people on the spectrum who have sensory sensitivity and will experience a sensory overload when in big crowds, noise, lighting etc. This is what Chris use to go through when he was little, and still does sometimes. The plan is for the store to open one hour earlier in the mornings to allow people who suffer from sensory overload to come in. This hour will lack electronic distractions, such as escalators, music and display TVs, and the public address system will not be used for announcements. Simon Lea, the manager, started thinking and brainstorming with colleagues and customers after he saw one of his customers, a boy with Autism, struggling to cope in the store.“If we can make a few small changes to give these customers a better shopping experience and make them comfortable then I know the store will be a better place to shop for everyone.”The store will open its doors to ‘quiet time’ on Saturday 7 May at 8am, the day after Chris’ birthday. And I KNOW that they aren’t doing this for Chris – but it kind of feels like they are. It kind of feels like we have had an impact, we have been a part of the wave of change which brought on this beautiful idea. That small boy in Asda has inspired an exception which will make a massive difference for the autistic community of Cheetham Hill, Manchester, and hopefully all the UK Asda branches.  Because of that little boy, the store manager asked, learned more about Autism and put together a plan to include people on the spectrum. That’s how awareness works, like an infection, like the plague. The Autism Awareness plague.
  2. Autism Puzzles, a Cardiff-based charity, trained a group of Cardiff Airport staff on how to better respond to the additional challenges faced by those living with autism, related conditions and their families. I mean, if you think bed time is difficult, travelling with Chris was torture when he was younger. Cardiff Airport is now equipped to offer support to the people that fall under the Autism exception. Kind of like wheelchair access, but for Autism; and what a wonderful thing wheelchair access is! I get furious when a building is not wheelchair accessible, now we can start getting mad at buildings that aren’t Autism accessible.

    The airport staff even hosted an open day on the first floor of the main airport terminal to promote Autism Awareness Month and to offer advice to staff and passengers regarding the condition.

    We appreciate that some aspects of the airport experience can be daunting for those living with autism and related conditions, so we are dedicated to continuing our partnership with Autism Puzzles and delivering the highest levels of customer service” Debra Barber, managing director and chief operating officer.

  3. On Thursday 28th April (this Thursday) the House Of Commons will host a three-hour debate about Autism. The debate is a motion on World Autism Week (which ended on 8 April). It cites “a lack of understanding of the needs of autistic people and their families”, and calls on the government to “improve diagnosis waiting time”. You can watch it or read the transcript here – no excuse for not knowing where to look! The debate will call for “a public awareness campaign so that people can make the changes that will help the UK become autism-friendly”.

Exceptional:

Accepting that Autism is exceptional needs further definition. If we view exceptional as meaning uncommon, rare, weird then we fall under the exception bracket of awareness. Accepting Autism as being remarkable/inspiring is the meaning I am going for here.

This sort of awareness requires a very broad kind of thinking, it needs you to bulldoze all your established conceptions of Autism. This kind of awareness comes from inspirational people committing inspirational acts in the name of Autism. The kind of acts that touch your heart instead of your brain. The ones that speak to your soul, your humanity, and draw your body to get out there and help, not the ones that make you brainstorm in order to develop plans and initiatives. The irrational rather than the rational, if you like.

Making Autism exceptional is only achievable through the telling of personal experiences. Only through the eyes and words of people who have been inspired by Autism can inspiration be spread.

  1. Castle Newnham pupils have made 1,000 paper cranes to raise money for a sensory room at their primary school, as part of Autism Awareness Week.Ancient Japanese legend tells of Gods granting a wish to anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes. Does it make sense? No. Does it touch your soul? Yes. Does it make you want to take up origami? Uh maybe. Does it make Autism exceptional? YES.
  2. On Sunday, the BBC ran a story about a father running the marathon for his son, Dylan, and in support of the National Autism Society. Jon Barbuti’s words are very similar to my own and he did this so that “Next time you see a kid have a meltdown you might see it differently, when a random kid grabs your arm to ask you if you know what Minecraft is you might see it just as their way of trying to engage in conversation.” Jon made Autism inspirational.
  3. You may have seen the, now gone viral, video of a boy with autism crying at a Coldplay concert because they are his favourite band. If you haven’t – you have to. Autism can feel, it can love, it can cry and it can laugh – and this video will make you feel all the things.

There are so many inspirational stories I could share with you that make Autism exceptional. The point of this week though is that we can make Autism a topic by making it an exception and by making it exceptional, it’s not a question of either/or – because Autism is both an exception and exceptional. I think the worst outcome would be if we made it either/or. Autism doesn’t need your pity or fear; it needs you to learn and adapt. It wants you to be inspired.

Autism doesn’t need an attitude of exceptions – it needs acceptance of the exceptional.

The struggle for awareness has reached a critical point. The point where we now know we can make a difference and have come a long way but, still have light years to get to where we want to be.

Happy Week 10! Here are some pics 🙂

England:

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Paris:

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Wales:

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3 thoughts on “#Project324 – Exception or Exceptional?

  1. Once again you’ve written beautifully about autism, Dora, and made people think very deeply about how it affects autistic people and their families. You have a gift for examining what is such a fine line and in reading your blog it really does make me appreciate how complex autism really is. It’s wonderful to read of the very simple, yet innovative, initiatives that are happening and that must raise awareness within the general public. Thank you.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  2. Pingback: Shopping with Autism | Just a boy

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