Hope in Poo

(One of) my New Year’s resolutions was to read more non-fiction books. I just finished a book about Pablo Escobar and now I’ve moved on to a nurse’s recollection of what it was like to be a nurse in the 50’s.

Both post-war Colombia and post-war Britain made the current politics scene more real than ever. People had just gone through a wars that left thousands dead, they lived in fear for years and in the end they thought it would never happen again.

IMG_5933And then these guys come along. In times like these it’s easy to give up and it’s easy to overlook hope.

So, I’m going to start a monthly hope write up. This month’s hope can be found in poo. That’s right, our world is so effed up that we can now find hope in poo.

On the 23rd January, a study was published in the Microbiome Journal (here) which claims that Microbiota Transfer Therapy (Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), also known as a stool transplant, is the process of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy individual into a recipient) alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms. The investigation involved 14 days of therapy with oral vancomycin (an antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections) followed by a 12- to 24-hour fast (clear liquids only) with a bowel cleanse using MoviPrep (laxatives). On day 16, to repopulate gut microbiota (the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that literally share our body space), a high initial dose of standardized human gut microbiota (SHGM) was given either orally or rectally for 2 days followed by daily, lower maintenance oral doses of SHGM coupled with a stomach-acid suppressant for 7 to 8 weeks. The stomach-acid suppressant was used to increase survival of SHGM through the stomach. The children were followed for an additional 8 weeks after treatment ended.

What?

Basically:  18 patients aged 7 to 17 years who had ASD and moderate to severe GI problems were given antibiotics for bacterial infection followed by laxatives for 14 days. Then, they were administered a high dose of a range of microorganisms for 2 days. Followed by a lower dose of said microorganisms and stomach-acid repressants for 7-8 weeks; which helps the microorganisms survive longer.

ASD-related symptoms improved, as reported by the Parent Global Impressions-III (PGI-III) assessment, which evaluates 17 ASD-related symptoms, showed significant improvement during treatment and no reversion 8 weeks after treatment ended.

One of the many theories about where autism comes from has been the gut. That’s why we use gluten-free and casein-free diets as an alternative treatment. In “Best Food Critic in Town” I mentioned: Marilyn Le Breton, who explains:

“When you eat, the food you consume is broken down in your stomach. The bits that are not used by the body are flushed out as waste matter. In autistic people, the breakdown of two proteins present in some foods, gluten and casein, is not completed properly. The resulting fragments of these proteins are called peptides. Peptides are small enough to pass through the wall of the gut, rather than being processed in the normal way. As the peptides journey around the body, they make a pit stop at the brain, where they do untold damage before continuing their journey and finally making their way out of the body, via urine. Both are very similar to morphine, a highly addictive drug.”

What this study proves, on a small scale, is that perhaps cleaning the gut of neurodiverse people from the bacteria that the body does not keep in neurotypical people could be the one of the answers we have been looking for.

Hope.

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2 thoughts on “Hope in Poo

  1. Pingback: Hope in millions | Just a boy

  2. Pingback: The Biology of Autism | Just a boy

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