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Summery Blue Balloons

A couple of posts ago I gave you a glimpse into my version of the world of Silver LiningsSilver Linings is a world we have created. In my head, it has very high ceilings and no stairs, or chairs or anything you can climb on. The silver linings are like balloons that deflate just a tiny bit every time progress is made. You go to silver linings when you are scared, because its a place of hope. It’s a place where fears and insecurities can be calmed because there are so may prospects and wonderful works in progress. 

There has been a lot of fear in July, all around the world we have witnessed inhuman acts of violence and hate. I forgot about Silver Liningsimg_3215. So, I spoke to my blue balloon, the one I will wait for forever the one that’s always just out of reach. He called me from the tablet we got him for his birthday. We said the usual: when I come to the airport he will eat bake rolls and drink iced tea. He kissed the screen and then asked mum to hang up so he could keep playing his game. I asked what he was doing now that schools are out and mum said that he is taking lessons with one of the girls. She has books, gold stars and even a red pen; she helps him with reading, writing, art and math. He is enjoying his summer, he is happy.

So, I went out in search for happiness, progress and deflated balloons and here’s what I found:

In Australia: Jack S, a 20 year old autistic man has landed his dream job in one of Sydney’s top restaurants. He will be working in the kitchen of award-winning celebrity haunt Catalina in Rose Bay. Jack has received a hospitality certificate at Meadowbank TAFE as part of his HSC and received an award for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance’s Transition To Work program. He works three days a week in the busy kitchen at the restaurant, under the guidance of head pastry chef Berny Osorio. His main duties include mixing, kneading and baking bread; preparing fruit; making biscuits; mixing marshmallow; washing salads; and plating up. You might remember, or know, that my dad is a chef at a hotel in Cyprus. Chris and I grew up with a love for cooking; and by cooking I mean food. We are trained to love any activity that gets us food. Chris can cook pasta, curry, lentils, rice, tomato sauce and probably a lot more that he just doesn’t want us to know because then we’d make him make it himself. He picks it up so easy, and he loves it. Even if we are making a dish, I can ask him to wash the tomatoes for me, to add the salt and pepper to the pan, to stir/mix, to grate the cheese and turn the heat up or down. In the last 5 years, and especially 2015, we have seen an all time high in utilising the pool of potential which is people on the spectrum.

In the US: An Albany restaurant and tavern has opened doors and opportunities for a local teen with autism. At the Orchard Tavern in Albany, they’ve taken on board 13 year old Jonathon Wade who was diagnosed with autism and Tourette’s syndrome. Jonathon is nonverbal, he communicates through iTouch, a program. Once a week, along with his aide, he goes to the tavern and folds boxes; he folds them, spins them, and stacks them. Jon refused payment from the Tavern, instead he asks for pasta with butter and a side of sauce. Jon sounds similar to Chris. I just want to point out how brave the parent are in situations like these. I mean the fear of leaving Chris anywhere for any amount of time is crippling, but its also depriving him of experience that he could have had. Sometimes, in life with autism, the line between selfishness and selflessness is blurred big time. He is so much more capable than we give him credit for, and he can do so much that we just end up doing for him. I hope that one day a member of his community will present him with the opportunities being provided to adults with autism all over the world. I hope that they see his capabilities, his potential and offer him employment.

In Cyprus: A young boy with autism, called Stephanos, has been the talk of the island. Stephanos has been taking piano lessons over the last year and a half and has make some amazing progress. He is the first person on the spectrum to undertake musical exams. His piano teacher calls him disciplined, cooperative and hard-working. He can follow instructions and he is a perfectionist, he doesn’t stop until it’s perfect.  I took piano lessons for years and years. I remember my piano teachers with so much love, they always asked about him and never judged. My first teacher, Mrs Rea, was the first one to mention to me that music may help. I remember him sitting on the piano we had at home and making so much noise. I even taught him a couple of notes, but being the rebel he is all he wanted to do was step on the pedals and make a fuss. When I go back home, I try to play and remember the music i was taught. He sits on the couch next to me, mutes the TV and listens until I stop. Sometimes I even get a kiss at the end of it.

There’s no end in the potential we can find all over the world, all we have to do is open our eyes and minds and make the unlikely places likely. There is kindness and love everywhere, unfortunately, you have to remember to look for it.

 

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