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21 and Atypical: Food, Glorious Food!

IMG_5234“He stares as we bring over the food, picks up the plate, smells it and then if we’re lucky takes a tiny bite; and by tiny I mean that ants would probably carry a bigger bit than the amount he is willing to try. Then comes the silence – we hold our breath, fists clenching, heart racing all waiting to see if he approves of the dish.”  Christos has been eating the same 5 things for most of his life; pasta & tomato sauce, curry & rice, egg & lemon soup, chicken nuggets, toast. When Christos switched to the GFCF diet my dad – chef extraordinaire – jumped to action and created recipes which incorporated all the things Christos wouldn’t try but which were nutritionally essential to his diet. Read more about Christos eating habits on Best food critic in town!

Stephanos was always very choosy with food as well. In 21 and Atypical: Stephanos we described how he went from eating fruity, colourful and varied foods to being reluctant and sceptical of them! He stopped trying new foods around the age of 1. Instead, Stephanos switched to pale coloured foods with a mild palette; for example, Cerelac, plain biscuits, bananas. Fruits with textures or colours stopped appealing to his appetite. Once he was diagnosed he switched over the the GFCF diet.

The GFCF elimination diet requires that all foods containing gluten and casein are removed from the child’s daily food intake. Gluten can be found in wheat, oats, rye, barley, durum, bread, pasta, cereal, cookies, soups, sauces, candy etc. Casein can be found in dairy products in general; milk, butter, cheese, ice cream etc. 

Marilyn Le Breton, author of ‘Diet Intervention and Autism’ explains why the GFCF diet may be the key to unlocking autism: “When you eat, the food you consume is broken down in your stomach… In autistic people, the breakdown of two proteins present in some foods, gluten and casein, is not completed properly. The resulting fragments of these proteins are called peptides. Peptides are small enough to pass through the wall of the gut, rather than being processed in the normal way. As the peptides journey around the body, they make a pit stop at the brain, where they do untold damage before continuing their journey and finally making their way out of the body, via urine. Both are very similar to morphine, a highly addictive drug.” In 2018 the Microbiome Journal (here) published a study which claims that Microbiota Transfer Therapy (Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), also known as a stool transplant, is the process of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy individual into a recipient) alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms. – More on this in Hope in Poo .

For both the boys switching to this diet – in Cyprus 20 years ago – was incredibly difficult. Our family used to order and ship maize pasta from Italy, order specialist flour and bread to be baked at bakeries, pack a whole suitcase of suitable products to take on a month long holiday. My parents fought endlessly to convince him to eat these new products and, to some extent, it made a difference! He was less agitated, less tired and more responsive without gluten and cassein. Funnily enough, this year I have had to go on the same diet for health reasons. But now, everyone is falling over themselves to accommodate my dietary requirements. Now, we find it weird if we can’t find gluten-free products anywhere.

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I think back to cooking maize pasta and carrying it around in tupperware with grated halloumi in tin foil to take to restaurants or visits, the smell of egg and lemon soup in our room in the Maldives over a bunsen burner, all the packets of crisps my parents had to ration between the two of us to last him through the holiday. I think back and wonder how did we survive in a world that didn’t understand why we couldn’t just have ‘normal’ pasta? The answer is: parents. Their endless, relentless and ferocious attitude, resilience and unstoppable drive.

Today, Stephanos eats strawberries, salad vegetables and all kinds of colourful and flavoursome fruits. In fact,m the first time he tried a red strawberry he was 8 years old. Hi diet is varied and he doesn’t struggle to try new kinds of food at school or restaurants or even at home. Christos eats fish, meat, sauces and has no issue trying buffet options or airplane food.

The boys love food. In fact, they plan their day around it (just like you and me). Their body just digests food differently to some people. Following the GFCF diet as a neurotypical adult I have noticed so many advantages in my body, mood, mental health and my every day life. I don’t feel fatigued, bloated, grumpy, my skin is glowing, my hair is growing, my mind is alert and keen. Maybe the advantages of the GFCF diet are just a glimpse in the many, many things we all have in common.

#21andAtypical – but atypical according to whom?

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