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Sibling Dance

The unusually hot UK summer has come to an end  on Christos’ last day in the UK – and he has just finished shopping in Oxford Street, London.

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The last week has been full of giggles and pleasant surprises. I am constantly amazed by how he has grown into a beautiful, mature adult with autism. And I am so grateful to our family for creating and sustaining this human who I can call my soulmate.

His basic schedule is simple – wake up, get dressed, eat, talk about when we will eat again, play his game boy, eat, talk about when he will snack, snack, talk about when he will eat again, talk about the schedule for the next day, talk about what we will eat the next day, eat, shower, tea, sleep. Anything out of this routine is discussed and it fits into the rest of the programme once agreed upon.

The fear of transport, restaurants and public spaces is not as big of an issue as it used to be. He will repeat what he wants to eat and drink and then he will patiently wait for the rest to finish. He adapts to change in plans and new environments like a pro. Like I said in my previous post it’s just the rest of us that stress out about all the above.

His maturity and adaptiveness is a credit to my mum, my dad and our grandparents. It is a credit to all our family how they love him, know him and praise him. The autism discourse used to focus only on the person on the spectrum, however it is their support system which moulds them and creates the adults that go off into society. We are seeing more and more studies and representation of parents and siblings of people on the autism spectrum and it would be naive not to include them in our journey to understanding autism.

Thing about soulmates is that we signed up to do this dance together even before we were born. If I had a choice now, 20 years later and knowing all the things I know, I would choose to spend all my lifetimes with him.

If you are into Netflix, Atypical Season 2 airs on Friday 07.09.2018. You can read my take on it here. If you’re in the UK, The A word delves deep into the family unit, together and individually. Each person is portrayed as a person. You can read my review here.

Tomorrow he travels back to Cyprus to resume the sleep, eat, repeat routine on home turf. Wish him a safe journey back and read something new about autism if you get a mo. I’ve gathered some articles below:

Schools ‘exclude autistic pupils through lack of understanding’

Bricks for autism: how LEGO-based therapy can help children

Autism: ‘If only I knew then what I know now’: Special school teacher Siobhan Barnett shares what working with autistic students has taught her about autism

Autism – five signs of autism spectrum disorder to look out for in children

‘Taboo’ autism seen as ‘disease’ in ethnic communities

How incy-wincy spider could show if your child is autistic

‘Autism and Learning Disability’ To Be A Priority in NHS England’s Upcoming 10 Year Plan

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Summer Love

This summer has been a tad amazing. Great weather, amazing friends, trips to remember, drama for weeks and a ton of lols. On the penultimate day of summer 2018 my 2018 summer secures a place in the Hall of Summers with a visit from my brother.

He arrived in the UK on Tuesday and will spend the next four days with me in Canterbury/London along with my mum and yiayia (grandma).

So far, their trip has been eventful to say the least.

Larnaca airport prides itself for being an airport for everyone. They have hosted days with people on the spectrum to experience the process of arrival, security checks, boarding and the aircraft. They have special paraphernalia to identify persons who require special assistance and priority service. In fact, ACI Europe awarded Larnaca International Airport with the first prize, among 500 other European airports from 45 states, in the category of “Most Accessible Airport for disabled persons and persons with reduced mobility.

Unfortunately, my family had to wait for an hour and a half while COBALT airlines found them three seats together – even though my brother had priority. This lead to them boarding the plane last. I assume that making a 20 year old autistic adult wait at check in for an hour and a half is not part of their accessibility offerings.

However, we recognise the efforts made by Hermes and we look forward to the smoothing out of such issues in the future.

We should also recognise that my brother flies quite often and therefore is familiar with airports. We are unable to fathom what would have happened if this was experienced by another person with autism.

Heathrow accessibility support on the other hand is incredible. They are prepared, organised, and trained to help. They act with professionalism and sympathy to people with hidden disabilities and the elderly. Due to Heathrow’s amazing partnerships with Autism West Midlands, the National Autistic Society and Autism Alliance they are ready, willing and able to assist travelers with cognitive disabilities and offer some comfort to their families.

40371016_479740792503127_4261342490960855040_nI must also mention Qatar’s accessibility support which we experienced in December while we were travelling back from Sri Lanka on our own. We were met at the aircraft door and we were accompanied to the door of our connecting flight. We were so comfortable that we didn’t even notice that we were there for 2 hours. This shouldn’t be a surprise since in 2007, the Qatar representative to the UN, Her Highness Sheikha Mozah bint Nasser Al Missned,  put forward a UN General Assembly resolution, to create World Autism Awareness Day. This gave way to a day dedicated to raising awareness about ASD across the world.

I hope that Larnaca and Cobalt will continue to learn and adapt, and one day follow the footsteps of these airports and become inclusive and sympathetic to people who require assistance.

He has adapted to the Underground, national rail and bus journeys better than I have after 10 years of living in the UK. I cannot put into words how proud I am of this boy, because he makes everything seem so easy. That’s the thing about autism – you have to know about it to know about it. And that’s why we are moved to tears when international airports, strangers and society make sure that our kids are looked after.

Of course even though my brother is cool AF, under the calmness of our tough exterior we are consumed by hurricanes because we know that the circumstances are not easy. That is why we worry ourselves sick whenever he is on the move, we don’t eat until he’s finished eating and we don’t sleep until he’s dreaming.

But, any autism family will tell you that stress, hunger and insomnia are a small price to pay for knowing your soulmate.

I will keep you updated on our Big Fat Cypriot Weekend which will be the perfect end to the perfect summer.