1

An autism sister watching Atypical Season 2, Episode 2

I’m only going to talk about Casey (the sister) in this post. I want you to see her the way I see her.  I want you to see through her to all the sisters out there.

42877323_986385234880394_644448336547414016_nThe sister at home – Champion. She is the neurotypical child. She is the one that outed her mum. She is a good student, and a sought after athlete.

She is attuned with her surroundings and the needs of every member of her family. She blames herself when the marriage is put in jeopardy, when Sam finds out and tries to keep normalcy when Sam needs it the most. She takes on responsibilities no one has assigned her with. No one in her family expects her to be all these things, to think of all the implications and consequences. Her thoughts and needs take a back seat because she is the neurotypical, she is the one that has to be there while the parents sort out their own stuff. There’s no time for her emotional distress because she has to step up for every other member in their family. Plus, no one asked how she was dealing with her parent’s problems or in her new school – her champion mask is impenetrable.

The sister at old school – Shield: Everyone knows that you do not mess with Casey and Sam. Sam continues coping at school without Casey because of the foundations she has laid in previous years. It is expected that there will be repercussions when it comes to Sam, and no one wants to take that risk with her. I’m getting ahead of myself but in Episode 3, a fellow pupil accidentally does something to Sam and she says to him “Tell Casey I didn’t mean it”. Her shield mask is impactful.

The sister at new school – Timid. We haven’t seen this side of Casey yet. Mostly because she is so assertive in all her other roles. She is outside her comfort-zone. No one knows her as Sam’s sister here – they know her as an athlete, they will get to know her as Casey. It’s hard for her to readjust and define herself as her own person. She resorts to funny remarks and sarcasm almost every opportunity she gets while she is at the new school. Like I mentioned above, no one in her family has asked how her first few days at school have been – not on screen anyway. That’s not something that just hasn’t been addressed in the script, that’s how it really is in life.

On her first day she had a brought prepared lunch from home, on her second day she has to survive on peanuts and on the third day someone offers her a helping hand (whether it’s a good idea or not is irrelevant). She grabs it because she needs to be taken care of. Do you see how inspired this analogy is? It’s a representation of all the crap she has to deal with in the last few days narrated in food, the thing that sustains us.

Instead of crumbling she picks herself up and watches the penguin cam with her brother. She doesn’t even see herself as being in need of support or comfort. She deals and returns to what’s important. She doesn’t take the compliment from her dad calling her a ‘good kid’ because the things she does, and the support she offers comes is who she is. It’s not fake, it’s not something she has to think of; it’s not for a reward. She has to find her Casey mask.

*End*

As an autism sister, it’s was impossible for me to define myself or to get to know myself when i was growing up. Family break ups and autism drowned out my noise. I never had the chance to sit down and think “Right, this is what I want; this is what I like; this is what I don’t like”. My teenage years were me moulding myself to what I thought my family needed.

I moved away because I thought that’s what I needed to do so I could offer my brother the best future I could. I did law because I thought it would make me financially stable for my brother. I did an MA because I thought that’s what was expected of me. And my relationships and friendships? Well.

In the last two years, I have gotten to know myself . I spend more time with me, I know what films I like – not because my friends like them. I know what music I want to listen to – not because it’s popular. I know what books I like to read – not because they’re bestsellers. I used to drink beer because we were at a pub or eat beef because steak is  ‘the best’. I’d go out every time people had plans without any regard to what I wanted, I’d watch all the blockbusters, listen to all the hits and pretend that I didn’t have a care in the world because no one likes a downer.

Now I know that I don’t want to be a solicitor, I don’t like beef, I can tell people I disagree without the crippling fear that they won’t like me anymore. 12 years down the line, I bagged myself a blind date with me.

It’s hard for any teen to figure out who they are. Add a break up and autism in the mix and things get even worse.

When you look at Casey, or an autism family, look beyond the autism cloak. They are still humans, flawed, broken, tired, brave, and sometimes inspirational humans. When you watch Atypical, read between the scripted lines.

Casey is the single most inspiring female character I have watched in the last few years. I hope you see her through my eyes and that you let her teach you about autism, family and love.

After the trauma of the first episode, i’m ready to binge. I’ll let you know when i come up for air. 😊

Advertisements
0

An autism sister watching Atypical: Season 2, Episode 1

FYI: This is what I thought of Atypical Season 1.

“There is a hole in the Antarctic the size of Maine.  It’s … the result of hot water bubbling under the ice. Invisible, but destroying the ice sheets from under the surface.”

I am completely enamored with this portrayal of an autism family unit – For two reasons.

42748877_724721124557754_6401491820877971456_nReason 1. [the hole is] the result of hot water bubbling under the ice. Invisible, but destroying the ice sheets from under the surface.

Chris and I were raised in a loving family unit for many years before it broke down. The way the four of us handled the break down was by letting the water boil and strip us, one sheet at a time. Throughout that time, we  treated each other in different ways – not always pleasant. We never pretended things were okay for Christos’ sake, and if we did we were really bad at it. See, autism doesn’t mean that it’s okay to lie to someone you love. Christos has always been treated as a son, a brother first and an autistic child/adult second. In times of chaos we kept the routine. In times of turmoil we treated him the same. We were all a constant presence for him, even when we didn’t want to be in each others company.

As a sibling I have tried to protect him, as a sibling to an autistic brother I was not ready. It’s funny to watch a version of my life on screen, with all the things I thought but never said. To imagine what Christos would have said if he was able to express himself. Despite not telling us what he thought, he was never treated as naive and we have never been under any illusion about his profound ability to understand us and comfort us then and now. He shows me time and time again that he loves me, even though we have scratched, hit and screamed at each other more times than I can remember.

Sure, to outsiders I might look like a jerk for teasing him, pinching him and deliberately making him angry – but, he is my brother first and an autism adult second. I deliberately misplace his things, I try to get away with not washing the dishes, not throwing away an empty bottle, singing in the car, even though I know it will annoy him. What kind of big sister would I be if I didn’t annoy my little brother?

Episode 1 captured the bubbling so well. It was like looking in a mirror to the past – that’s the best way I can think of describing it.

Reason 2. There is a hole in the Antarctic the size of Maine. The hole is always there, whether we acknowledge it or not, we lost something palpable, something that can never be replaced, it can never be the same. Even if the water was frozen again, it wouldn’t be the same water that turned to ice. Nevertheless, a hole doesn’t mean emptiness, it doesn’t mean darkness.

The sheets melted away and each one brought us closer to surface. We were no longer solid, we were no longer boldly assuming that we could stand firm against anything.  Instead, we became fluid – constantly changing, silently powerful, adaptable and immense.

Our relationships became a polynya, which is much stronger, deeper and more mysterious than ice.

*End*

I have been avoiding watching Atypical Season 2 because of how many people told me how good it is and that I have to watch it. It is good. It is !so worth watching. It is also agony to empathise, to let every silence turn into tears, to feel every twitch, every growl of the soul – and I’m only on episode 1.

Give it a chance. Look for the small things, like the little notes around the house, positioning, the routine, the things that are left unsaid.

Look for the bubbles.

1

Atypical:

Just binge-watched the much anticipated Netflix Original series ‘Atypical‘. The series follows Sam, who is on the Autism Spectrum, on his journey to finding love.

Even though its sold as a comedy, the show made me ugly-cry a lot more than it made me laugh out loud. The show presented many big and small moments that I have experienced first hand. The autistic lead is sincere and very well portrayed. You can see the extensive research that went into developing the ‘Sam’ character and he delivers quite well, in my opinion. Obviously, not everyone on the spectrum is like Sam, but I think this series is more about the family rather than the lead.

I can’t think of anything I disliked about the show, although you’ll hear a lot of self-proclaimed experts throwing shade at every opportunity. To them I say, appreciate the effort of incorporating an autism story into something as mainstream as Netflix. To you I say, watch it. Remember, not every person on the spectrum is like Sam, but this is a good starting point.

What was the inspiration for the story?
Robia Rashid says: “After working in network TV for a while, I just wanted to do something for myself. I was very aware that more people were being diagnosed with autism, and it was interesting to me that a whole generation of kids were growing up knowing that they were on the spectrum and wanting independence. That point of view seemed so interesting to me — and such a cool way to tell a dating story. You’ve seen the story of somebody looking for independence and looking for love before, but not from that specific point of view. I really was drawn to that. I was a little annoyed because it sounded really hard! I had to do a lot of research. A turning point was when I figured out that I wanted to use Sam’s voice-over. But it was both helpful and harder because it made the project much harder to write.”

Your son has the same desire to be loved that we all do.” This was the sentence in the trailer that made me want to watch Atypical. (I write about love here a lot)

I saw a lot of myself and my family in the Atypical family. The mum’s passion, making her life all about autism for so long that she forgot to live her own. The dad’s sweet disposition, feeling a disconnect to his son but making silent gestures to show his everlasting dedication to his family.

And of course, the sister. Sam’s sister spoke to me more in what she left unsaid. Watching the show as an autism sister I saw in her all the thoughts I have had in the last 19 years. I have so much in common with her and her family life. Not the obvious, as I am anything but a track star. Her triumphs are overlooked, her life is dependant on her brother’s and her future hangs in the balance. Sam says his sister never lets him get beat up as she instinctively steps in front of him when someone asks what’s wrong with him. Yet throughout the series she playfully punches him, hits him, climbs over him and jokes about his quirks. Casey (the sister) is so well written as a character she made me cry every time she was on screen.

Casey’s success is overshadowed because her family is preoccupied with Sam. When she meets up with them, she doesn’t hold a grudge. When her big news is obscured by what will happen to Sam, it’s her boyfriend who makes a scene about it to the parents. Casey knows Sam is paramount, she knows because she wants him to be. She struggles with deciding whether to ‘move on’ and do what’s best for her or to stay and help Sam through the hard times coming in the household. I lived this struggle. She is fearless when its comes to her brother and telling people to back off. She is his.

I can’t wait for season 2 of Atypical and I know it will be just as touching as the first. Well done Netflix. Well done to Robia Rashid for taking this on and doing it so well.