0

21 and Atypical: Planet Blue💙

It’s autism awareness month and you may notice that a lot of the posts are blue. You may also scroll past or see numerous autism-friendly events and educational activities which will be taking place all month, everywhere in the world, in order to increase understanding, acceptance and further support people with autism.

52315751_615955368857944_8055010700344426496_n

But why blue for autism? While there’s no definitive answer I think the reasoning is found in the meaning of Blue.

Blue is a colour found in nature such as the pale blue of a daytime sky or the rich dark blue of a deep ocean. It is for this reason that it is described as calm and serene. Blue seeks peace and tranquillity and although life with autism is not calm, Christos and Stephanos feel safe in their own space and surrounded by people that adore them. Stephanos’ godsister, Joanna, remember their days in primary school when Stephanos used to wait for her to pick him up from class for break and hold her hand when they had to play volleyball or basketball at gym. Aren’t you most at peace when you feel safe?

Blue is also a cool colour which can sometimes seem icy, distant or even cold. Before the diagnosis, the speech therapy and before we adjust to this new world of living with autism it can sometimes seem as though they are distant or not interested. When they don’t respond to their name, when they wiggle themselves out of a hug, when they wipe away a kiss, it may seem like a loss but Christos is an affectionate man who intimacy. He laughs with us, eats with us and cries when we are sad. He helps us when we are in pain and he surprises us with hand holding or a kiss. Stephanos, is more social in general and he allows kids to approach and touch him, to hold his hand, to guide him and even to kiss his cheek. He responds and seeks affection from his family while also showing them he loves them daily. The myth about people on the spectrum being unapproachable is one we aim to dispel every day. Don’t you find that you appreciate your alone-time as well?

42816046_319009918650137_5237303023620849664_nBlue is idealistic, it explores and pushed the boundaries of self-expression; in fact, it is the most used colour in business and 53% of country flags incorporate some shade of blue. Christos and Stephanos push limits in communication without words. They are imaginative and creative in their journeys. Stephanos dances, sings, plays music and has his own drawing studio. At school his talents are further cultivated by creating through woodwork and using the hot glue gun to complete his own work. His abilities are not defined by his speech or his ways of stimming and he reminds everyone around him to not underestimate his neurodiversity.

Blue can be conservative and predictable, a safe and secure colour; a traditional colour if you like. Christos used to be notorious for not liking change. Over the years we have seen such massive changes in him in terms of eating habits or changing his daily schedule last minute. He has become open-minded and has broken out of the shell the word ‘autism’ imposed on him. He is safe in his predictability and unpredictable in his emotional intelligence. Change may be difficult for Blue but how many of you are completely comfortable with frequent changes?

Blue also represents freedom. Perhaps freedom of mind, freedom to be whomever they want to be. Free from the restraints and pressures of social ‘norms’, liberated from being confined in one box and ‘fitting in’.

So, it’s autism awareness month and if you are reading this you’ve taken one step to contributing in spreading awareness. Other things you can do are:

Tell someone it’s autism awareness month.

Wear blue; a t shirt, accessory, or even blue jeans with the intention of it being for autism!

Image result for autism awareness puzzle ribbonDisplay the puzzle: The Autism Awareness Puzzle Ribbon is the most recognised symbol of the autism community in the world. Wear the Autism Awareness Puzzle Ribbon – as a pin on your shirt, a magnet on your car, a badge on your blog, or even your Facebook profile picture. The puzzle pattern reflects the complexity of the autism spectrum. The different colours and shapes represent the diversity of the people and families living with the condition. 

Find out what’s happening near you. Many Autism 15032849_10154114892521238_68260037536364233_nSociety local affiliates hold special events in their communities throughout the month of April.

Watch a movie or documentary about autism. Louis Theroux’s documentary “Extreme Love Autism”, Oscar nominated “Life, Animated”, “Autism in Love” on Netflix, “Girls with Autism” on ITV are just a handful of recent depictions of autism.  You can also read about Autism, and it doesn’t have to be a journal, or research. It can be fiction, like “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by Mark Haddon, “House Rules” by Jodi Picoult or “Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend” by Matthew Dicks.

Donate to your local charity or ours Autism Support Famagusta .

Read #21andAtypical, share your story and #StandUpForAutism .

By embracing the puzzle piece, not the missing puzzle piece, we embrace the piece of our world that is autism. Tomorrow, the world will follow a tradition pioneered by Autism Speaks and Light It Up Blue. And while lighting a blue light doesn’t help parents struggling to balance a job, a family and autism, it raises awareness. Awareness will come from people who notice the different monuments/buildings worldwide going blue, a window in a quiet street displaying a puzzle ribbon, a local business fundraising for autism and they will ask questions about it. They might tell others, or go home and read about it. They may recognise it next time they see it and not stare, they might pass down the knowledge to younger generations.

If we could go into every house and help every family struggling with autism, we would. Instead, we will wear blue and we will tell people to wear blue. We will tell them why and we will talk about autism until all the pieces fit, until everyone understands.

From the Empire State Building in New York, Niagara Falls, the London Eye, Sidney Opera House, Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, Petra in Jordan, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, the Taj Mahal in India, the Table Mountain in South Africa, the Burj Al Arab in Dubai, the Canton Tower in China, and the Great Buddha at Hyogo, people all over the world will Light it Up Blue to honour World Autism Awareness Day tomorrow. Will you?

Advertisements
0

21 and Atypical: More than meets the eye

Autism traits are not immediately visible all the time. It may take a while to notice the stimming, the echolalia or the sensory deprivation. For decades we have been trying to be as mainstream as possible, but the tables are turning now and our uniqueness is being celebrated. People are telling their stories and we are telling Christos and Stephanos’ stories with the hope being that you look a bit closer, stare a bit less and learn a bit more next time you meet a family on the spectrum. 

Christos and Stephanos are just 2 neurodiverse adults. They communicate through PECS or simple sentences, they reach milestones at their own pace, they love, laugh and feel the same as you. They are a bit more sensitive to light or noise and may come to a conclusion a different way but they are an equal part of ‘your’ world. This society we have conjured up, with its timeframes, standards and expectations is in constant motion and it is up to us to make sure no one gets left behind just because they don’t fit into a make-believe box. The perpetual need to fit in is what makes up most of the worries autism families have. Will he fit in? Will she support herself? What if they get lost? Will they find their way? Who will be there when we’re gone? The therapies they undergo are for their own quality of life, but the social conditioning they go through – no flapping, no screaming, no stimming etc – comes from fear of being different. It stems from the desperation of wondering what society will do to them if we aren’t there.

Then, they do something amazing and we forget all about society’s fictional rules and its illusions of greatness. Because we witness greatness every day. Our kids are living proof that just because someone said it was impossible doesn’t mean it is. That just because they didn’t speak until they were 8 doesn’t mean they don’t understand what we say. They stomp all over misconceptions and create worlds that work on inspiration, love and growth. We see this every day with our kids but we spend so long worrying and sheltering them that we forget how intelligent they are and that they have been watching us and learning for years while we were too busy talking. 

thumbnail_8C5CE67D-701A-4313-916B-8E79ACC208CDStephanos’ mum remembers a cruise trip to the Greek Islands with all 6 kids. “On the second day we were all upstairs playing cards and Steph was stimming around us, in our line of vision. There were 6 pair of eyes focused on playing cards but also watching Steph. At some point, in a split second, he was gone. We lost him. Steph’s verbal abilities at that age were limited but he could say “toilet” and “help”. Immediately, the 6 of us had spread out on both sides of the ship, on all the floors, in the lifts and asking people if they had seen him. Finally, some restaurant guests who knew us from Ayia Napa said they had seen him in the lift going down. We went to our floor immediately and found him in the loo. He used the lift, went to the correct floor and corridor and knocked on his brother’s room door which was different to our own! What is amazing to me is that he knew our room was empty and so knocked on his brother’s door instead.” It may seem menial to you, going to the loo when you need to, but it was a milestone for Stephanos. It was an eye-opener for the family, and a reminder that just because they are overprotective and Stephanos doesn’t speak  it doesn’t mean that he is not fully aware of his surroundings or capable to make rational decisions to fit his needs.

Last year, when Christos and I were travelling back from Sri Lanka we were sat on 29746571_10156190751480030_515778963_othe plane repeating his schedule and what times he would eat what. So we’re cuddling under the blankets talking about pasta when I realised I had to explain time zones to my brother who is obsessed with time. IMAGINE, trying to explain time zones to someone with only numbers and the words – dad, mum, Christos, Theodora, airplane, and (obviously) pasta.  I showed him the time in Colombo and said this is dad, the time in Doha which is where Christos and Theodora are going, and the time in Cyprus where mum is. Then explained that the airplane would take off and land in between Colombo and Cyprus at Doha. He was staring at the phone and me while I’m making grand gestures and airplane noises and showing him numbers. I wasn’t sure he got it, I underestimated him. Then we got to Doha and he asked me to change the time on my phone to the local time, for which he had done the math in his head, and did the same when we landed in Cyprus. Now, he has a globe in his room and can point to where we all are and where we’re going next. 

We’ve seen these boys grow, learn and make progress in front of our eyes. Yet, somehow these false thresholds set by our communities seep into our subconscious and make us forget how extraordinarily ordinary they can be. They quickly catch us by surprise, always a step ahead, whether it’s giving us directions or using words we didn’t even know they knew and remind us to not stereotype but to learn about the talents our kids have and to stop thinking there’s a limit to their potential.

Just because a computer is not running Windows doesn’t mean that it’s broken. Not all the features of atypical human operating systems are bugs” – Neurotribes Read more about Autism Advantages.

0

Hot Sunday

 

It’s Sunday and Chris is with dad. They are up to the usual ‘Dad Routine‘. Playing with flat beans, cooking curry and going for walks. 

They will prepare his meals together, like i mentioned before there is a special recipe for everything he eats and he loves helping and contributing to the process.

They haven’t seen eachother for a while so Christos decided to overindulge and had two plates of curry.. Which turned out to be a little bit too hot for him. In this video, even though his face is on fire, he still smiles.

 

Happy Sunday!

1

Army: Enlisting Autism

If I had to make a list of improbable professions for Autism, at the top of my list would be the Army. However, on the 6th of Jan I read an article about Israel’s Defence Force’s “Visual Intelligence Division”. Unit 9900 soldiers act as eyes on the ground for highly sensitive operations, analysing complex images delivered in real time from military satellites around the world. Isn’t that mental? When I think of army, I still think of open fields, Captains riding horses, swords and general gruesomeness.

So, I researched a bit more and found that between 2004 and 2011 in Israel, the number of Israelis on the autism spectrum increased fivefold, with 1,000 new diagnoses per year, according to a survey released by the country’s Social Affairs Ministry. Obviously, that is due to a lot of things; mostly, the scientific advancements that have occurred within the past 20 years which enable diagnosis to be available more readily and accurately now. I wasn’t surprised to read about the stigma that follows Autism everywhere it is. There have been suspensions from schools, mostly attributed to the fact that there are no official special education guidelines for autistic students which the school should follow. That’s why we need awareness – so that we can create a framework for all over the world, so that children on the spectrum won’t be branded as naughty or get dosed up on medication at school. This doesn’t just happen in Israel, this happens in the UK, this happens in the US – children on the spectrum are not provided with the education they deserve.

Ro’im Rachok, which in Hebrew means “seeing into the future” is a programme that is aimed at teenagers/adults with Autism. They recruit graduates and provide them with training for enlistment in the Israel Defense Forces. The programme has already had two cohorts of autistic Israelis who have successfully served as image analysts. Much like any other high risk job there are a lot of tests to overcome in order to become part of the Ro’im Rachok. It’s not like the army goes in and picks up all the autistic kids and forces them to join. In fact, students have to undergo tests and interviews so as to ensure that they actually have the skills to be able to analyse images. Not everyone on the spectrum is a genius, or can analyse pictures. Only 12 made the cut this year.

Israel’s 12 then were hosted by the Ono Academic College, which teaches satellite-image analysis. This is a three-month course which runs three times a year. During the three months, the unit’s commanders begin to train the recruits on how to read aerial maps, amongst other things. The thing that really impressed me was the support provided to the ‘students’ during the initial process as well as the course. They can opt-out at any point, they have a team of therapists who they meet regularly who are there to help them with adjusting to the new routine and dealing with stress. I mean this could be anything from getting to campus for class and to digesting the importance and responsibility of the work itself. They have constant support which is crucial. It’s one thing to start a programme with autistic recruits and it’s a whole other world knowing how to maintain it and reinforce it with the appropriate support.

The final phase, which is also 3 months, consists of professional training and therapy sessions at an army base in Tel Aviv. Then they, and they alone, decide if they are ready for enlistment. So, from recruitment to the end of the 6 months there is absolutely no obligation to enlist. Some may walk away with enriched social skills, enhanced professional training and benefits from the therapy which will lead to a better life, hopefully, for them and their families. They get to go home with a sense of worth – they get to apply for jobs and say ‘Hey, I trained for the army’. They get to go out into the world and destroy stereotypes. The ones that do enlist also have the choice to opt out after the end of each year. Or they can go on to complete the required term of service; three years for men and two for women. Yes, women with Autism can be recruited, trained and enlisted too – why did you think they couldn’t? Ro’im Rachok has had one female soldier to date (2016).

One of the recruits, who is only 21, described the job as sitting in front of computer screens and scanning high-resolution satellite images for suspicious objects or movements; this is decoding. I also found out that Israel’s battlegrounds are very complex and inhabited by civilians most of the time; which I guess is the case in most conflict zones. This is why the job Unit 9900 does is so important – because it protects civilians. The autistic recruits analyse these satellite images, decode them, comb  through each millimetre of the same location from various angles and warn soldiers on the ground of what lies ahead, inform them if there is dangerous or suspicious activity; they are helping prevent the loss of life of soldiers on the ground and civilians.

When you think of Autism – do you think it is capable of this enormous responsibility? Because they are, and reading and learning is the way for you to realise the potential held by these remarkable individuals. Autism isn’t something negative, it is not a disease; it’s a character trait. Ro’im Rachok is already thinking long-term and for ways in which they can train recruits to apply for roles like quality assurance, programming, and information sorting. This expansion by the Israeli army means that the autistic community in Israel, and the world, will get recognition domestically and globally. On a domestic level they are given the opportunity to work, just like with Microsoft and the BBC. They get to become known for more than just their Autism and be welcomed and integrated into their societies.

When the whole neighbourhood suddenly sees their neighbour, a boy on the autism spectrum, coming home on Friday in uniformand hears that they can also continue in these fields into civilian work—it naturally has an enormous influence” – Efrat Selanikyo, occupational therapist at Ono College.

When the whole world suddenly finds out about people on the spectrum that are put in charge of handling situations which carry such great responsibility and excel at it; when they read about how Autism can advance, develop and surpass all the expectations the global community has of them; when they hear stories about how an autistic decoder helped save the lives of soldiers and civilians on the ground; and when they see a picture of an autistic person in uniform being praised for their bravery and service to their country and the Autism community; that’s when we break society’s rules. That’s when we expand our society into accepting people that are unique.

That’s when we become human.

0

Legacy

Christos wore the jumper I bought him for Christmas on New Years  – the one that says ‘Unwrap Me’. He said Happy New Year, he said Merry Christmas, he
gave us lots of Skype kisses and then he sat down at the top of the table, had his dinner and then went upstairs to play with his game boy.

What were his New Year’s resolutions? Well he wants to have a Lemon Iced Tea and Garlic Bake Rolls at the airport when I visit in February. I am not visiting in February – this is just something he does. I have two theories on why he does this: 1) He wants Bake Rolls and Iced Tea, which he only gets when he goes to the airport, and since the last time he had them was August, well, he misses those two things; 2) He misses me – I like to believe that is why he has made up a date for me to visit.

That was his new years resolution. Autism is not this pandemonium-spreading ‘disease’, with the correctly adjusted supervision, thousands of hours of hard work, repetition, routine, and cooperation we get to create humans worthy of being part of a society. Every child on the spectrum is different and 2015 has been a great year in terms of Autism News. From my perspective, there has been so much coverage, initiatives, events specifically for Autism than any other year.

The most recent eye-cathcing news is Hillary Clinton’s plan to support children, youth, and adults living with Autism. For those of you who don’t know, this isn’t the first time Clinton has dabbled in Autism. In fact, as First Lady, raised awareness and funding for autism by supporting the bipartisan Children’s Health Act of 2000, focusing on Autism research. In the Senate, she introduced the bipartisan Expanding the Promise for Individuals with Autism Act, facilitating interventions and support for Americans with Autism. She also,  cosponsored legislation in 2006 which allocated a significant amount of money for autism-related programs; research, education, early detection, and intervention. All publicity is good publicity. Now the media is talking about how other candidates in the race will ‘match’ Clinton’s plan. Hell, if that’s what it takes to get the government to look at Autism initiatives then so be it; i’ll take it – we all will. Any initiative is an initiative, any debate is a debate, any research, any failed programme anything is progress.

2016 is a big year. A colleague and I have relocated to Brussels, it’s a Leap Year, the USA might have it’s first female president, another Bush or (god forbid) Trump, Boy George is on the Voice, Christo is turning 18. My brother is turning 18. He will be considered – by society – to be an adult. But what will this society offer him when he reaches adulthood?

What will you do this year to make sure that your fellow humans, your kids, your neighbours kids, whoever’s kids have a smooth and enjoyable transition from teenager to adult? What are we, what is this generation, giving the next generation?

It all starts with reading, listening, researching about, in this case, Autism. Educate yourselves and those around you, learn about Autism and pass on a legacy that will make future generations better.

1

Autism in 2015

2015 has been an interesting year for Autism and a lot of spectrum stories had their spotlight moment.

  1. Julia, the ‘Sesame Street’ first-ever muppet with Autism
  2. img_0198NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity‘ is an Autism book nominated for the Samuel Johnson Prize. Steve Silberman’s NeuroTribes documents the funny history of autism, the neurodiversity of the autistic population, and dismissed the notion of af an “autism epidemic.” It debuted on the New York Times bestseller list and has been picked as a top Human Right’s book.
  3. Largest study ever conducted to prove that there is no MMR-Autism link in large study of vaccinated versus unvaccinated kids. In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published the study which compared autism rates among vaccinated versus unvaccinated children. The investigation followed more than 95,000 children and confirmed again that there is no link between autism and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.
  4. The word “neurodiversity” was added to dictionary.com. It is defined as “the variation and differences in neurological structure and function that exist among human beings, especially when viewed as being normal and natural rather than pathological.”
  5. High-profile Initiatives:
    1. Microsoft announced a new pilot program with Specialisterne, focused on hiring people with autism for full-time, Microsoft positions.
    2. The BBC launched ‘Employ Me’ which will enable people with neurological conditions to find employment – from autism and Tourette’s to ADHD and Down’s Syndrome.
    3. Spectrum Singles is a dating site for people on the Autism spectrum, created by people on the Autism spectrum. Unlike other dating sites, it brings together all people on the spectrum for dating or friendships, but it is also unique in that it is able to acknowledge and integrate a person according to their position on the spectrum. The Spectrum Compatibility Test™ narrows down the prospects to match individual spectrum characteristics with a select group of spectrum compatible matches.
  6. Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and author of many books which explored human neurology, succumbed to cancer and Iain Croft, the founder of Autism World Magazine, passed this December.
  7. RiverTown Crossings Mall Santa caused a sensation online in the run up to Christmas because he sat down and listened to a little boy who decided to tell Santa that he is not a naughty boy, he has Autism. And that Santa told him that it’s okay – it’s okay to be who you are.
  8. Girls with Autism‘ debuted on ITV and it was breathtaking. The first ever documentary about Britain’s only state-run school for girls with autism and offered a unique insight into what it means to be autistic and a teenage girl.
  9. James Williams, or Jim the Trim  barber in Briton Ferry Wales, posted photos showing himself lying on the ground next to Mason, a boy with Autism, giving him a haircut.He did this because Mason is wary of getting his hair cut. Which we can definitely relate to with Christo. Up until a couple of years ago my parents did it at home. A couple of years before that we, all three of us, had to physically hold him down so as to get through a hair cut. It’s a beautiful story, not because it is unique, this happens in a large number of Autism homes. It’s a beautiful story because it is a reflection of what humanity can become.
  10. Ten will be that Christos now eats salmon, and chicken, and peas, he shaves his stubble on his own and he is really good at darts. He knows the word ‘mermaid’ in Greek and he is still only 17. Ten is that people that didn’t grow up around him, didn’t go to school with him know about him, know his name, find comfort in his stories and send him wishes, love and strength. It is about the 100,000 people he has reached this year and the opinions he has changed.

Ten is Christos.

Happy New Year World

3

Christmas Wishlist

I’ve heard three Christmas stories this week.

  1. The recurring one was actually the same story I hear every year. The story you probably hear every year at this time – the one about presents. The one where you start complaining about how expensive Christmas is, or how busy the shops are, or how tired you are because you’ve had too many Christmas parties already.
  2. The second one was about Sean Stewart. Sean is 10 years old and lives in Louisiana . His wish this Christmas is to receive 1,000 Christmas cards. You see, Sean’s favourite thing in the world is getting mail. Last year, his mum launched a card campaign through which he received 450 cards. She said “He’s definitely a person who shows that, despite the odds, he’s willing to and he’s tried so hard to break this idea of what people speculate, or what people think about with people with special needs. He is definitely breaking the mold”. Ah, Sean is on the spectrum. Sean’s mom says in addition to helping with his communication, the Christmas card campaign has helped her son develop new interests in things, like collecting stamps and stickers and learning about geography. You can send Sean cards at: Sean Stewart, P.O. Box 359, Natchitoches, LA 71458.
  3. The last one was about a mall Santa. It read “My child is amazing! He has his quirks and drives me bonkers, but he is amazing! The other day he went to see Santa w the cousins. He said his peace to the old man in red and walked away. While aunt Brittany waited for pictures to print, he went back to Santa bc he wanted to tell him that he has Autism. He was flapping his hands, all excited to let Santa know that he has autism. Santa sat him next to him and took L’s hands in his and started rubbing them, calming them down. Santa asked L if it bothered him, having Autism? L said yes, sometimes. Then Santa told him it shouldn’t. It shouldn’t bother him to be who he is. L told Santa that sometimes he gets in trouble at school and it’s hard for people to understand that he has autism, and that he’s not a naughty boy. Santa told L to not worry and that he has been a very good boy being who he is. They sat, and chatted for at least 5 mins. Santa payed close attention and listened to him. This just melts this momma’s heart! My child is a great advocate for himself. But this day was different. He opened up to this person about who he was and he was accepted. He wasn’t a science experiment, like he gets treated when most people find out he autistic. He was Landon, sitting with Santa and being told that it was ok to be himself. Mommy tells him all the time that he’s special and I love him the way he was made, but it’s always nice to hear it from others. To be told that it’s ok to be who he is.
    We have met a lot of amazing people in our Autism journey, but this one made the top of the list.
    Shout out to the Santa at the RiverTown Crossings Mall. You.are.AMAZING.

This Christmas, amongst the THOUSANDS of presents you buy, you can maybe send a card to Sean, or sit with a person on the spectrum or one of their family members and just listen. It is impossible to explain to people whose Christmas budget may easily count up to thousands that an autism family’s Christmas list looks like this:

  • Make sure my child is comfortable.

Only when it comes to food does Christos ever ask us to buy him something. He used to maybe ask for anything that had Toy Story or Super Mario on it, and because it’s such a rare occurrence we would rush to buy it for him. When we were in Disneyland, this year, he would point at stuff, I’d run over and pick it up to buy and he would grab my hand and ask me to return it. He didn’t want it, he didn’t need it; he just wanted me to look at that toy from Toy Story, he wanted to tell me who the character was, he wanted me to be as excited to see it as he was. It’s difficult buying Christos presents because he literally doesn’t need anything and he never asks for anything either. I used to buy him packs of DVD’s, which he would hide for years, or games for this Game Boy which he probably hasn’t played since I bought them because he only plays one game per year approx. So, now I buy him clothes because I know he’ll wear those (sometimes). This year i got him a jumper that says ‘Unwrap me’ which I think the family will giggle at – and Christos will enjoy smile that comes with the jokes he won’t understand.

Christos doesn’t write Santa lists, he doesn’t get a new phone, or the latest game; he doesn’t want it. All he wants is the meal. The one where all of our insanely loud family sits around a table and eats until there is nowhere  else to put food except Tupperware to take home for the next couple of days. The one where my grandpa will say ‘Christo Cheers’ to him a million times and Christo will clink his glass a million and one times, because its Christmas and he knows that’s what we do on Christmas. He loves having people over – because of the food, but also because he loves having our family around. He loves the people he spends Christmas with and isn’t that what Christmas is all about? Loving your people. He waits for my mum to decorate the massive Christmas tree, and the rest of the house. She does an amazing job – and that perfectly decorated tree will be our Christmas memory forever. He wants the lights to be on, all flickery and cheerful, he reminds mum when she forgets. I think they still have a date booked on the calendar for when the tree goes up.

He’s learned to adapt to these
exaggerated surroundings for Christmas. Yes, his sensory sensitivity must go over the roof with the colours, the lights, the shouting, the food, the singing, the sheer madness – but he loves it. He waits for it. He has learned that that’s what we do, that’s who we are and he accepts it. He doesn’t want to be alone, or left out, or locked in his room. He wants to be alone with us – that’s his gift to us.

Don’t forget to send Sean a card this year; to tell a family they are doing a good job; to appreciate how lucky you are; to help a struggling parent in a busy shop with a crying kid. Don’t forget to be kind.

Happy Christmas world.