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Hear me roar (about autism): 2013-2014

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus – and it hosts my brother. 

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

After my graduation I was a bit lost. I didn’t know if I wanted to pursue a career in law, I isolated my self and spent most of my days on the couch or in bed. I had decided not to return home (to Cyprus) all the pursuit of happiness and love. Only, after three years of living away from home I still wasn’t any wiser re the happiness and completely lost about the love bit. One gloomy day, I was re re watching an old series when an episode about writing spoke to me. Coincidentally, I had a little run-in with blog writing at a temp job where I wrote a post about unemployment and the woes of being a law graduate in the state of today’s economy. The process, as well as the response, made me think this was destiny (I believed in destiny when I was 22, just like you did). So, I got out of bed and did some research. Ok I sat up in bed and did some research.

The blog tips I got from various internet sources, sitcoms and friends were “Be yourself”, “Spell check” and “Pick a theme, write about something you’re passionate about” – so what was I passionate about? Looking back now, it was so obvious and I don’t know why it took that long to find the answer. I was still learning about myself and crawling my way out of my own personal dark ages for the previous ten years so I had to dig deep and shed all the layers and masks I had on. One night, I was Skyping home and Christos was being a tiger on camera. After that I spoke to dad about the issues he was having at school. I hung up, cried and realised I’m passionate about him and his future. Destiny (i thought) struck again when I read a guest blog article on BBC about how autistic children are presented with special jargon phrases. Mark Neary captured it completely; it made me laugh out loud and at the same time gave me the courage to create this page and write my first post .

199123_10150167935090030_1697873_n (1)The next two years where a blur. The blog took off in a way that I never expected and so did I. I had so much to say, share, relive, consider, reflect on and learn. Writing all this down made me cry every time. Suddenly, in two years I went from re re watching series in bed and avoiding my feelings to advocating for rights in Canada, Australia, France, the UK and writing articles about us in Greek, writing to MPs and governments around the world. I was approached by autism charities, organisations, radio stations, TV stations about my story (links to articles under Published tab on main page). There was no hiding anymore, no masks.

Writing became a regular thing. It got me out of bed, it made me think, it made me angry, it made me change things and perceptions around me. I had found my voice and the roar I had been suppressing was bursting out of me. My life was filled with people from all around the world who were going through the same thing I was, who wanted guidance, help or advice. People who had just gotten a diagnosis, or who didn’t know which therapy to go for, or parents who worried about how the siblings of the kid with autism would be affected. Writing about autism brought me the happiness I was looking for and it made me look at me in a different way. I knew so much more than I gave myself credit for. I had so much to give and the sadness and anger I felt transformed into inspiration and were channelled into this blog – which made a difference in other peoples’ lives but, perhaps more importantly it mended my ties with my family, and myself. I learned so much about myself through writing about Christos – yet another gift he has given me.

I published 52 posts on the blog in 2013/2014 and, today, this is my 201st post. On the second day of 2020 I won’t set any resolutions because it doesn’t matter what you think you want to do or what is expected of you – what you are is already you. So I am grateful for transformation my brother inspired in the last 21 years, I am thankful for all the friends we have around the world through this blog and I am more inspired than ever to continue advocating for this cause.

I hope you will join me.

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The girl with the Dora mask: 2011-2012

I am saying goodbye to my 20s this year and to counteract the selfish need to reflect on the last decade I will be fundraising for the Smile Project by Autism Support Famagusta. Smile is the first and only day care centre for adults with autism in Famagusta, Cyprus.

For more information: Smiling September

To donate please follow this link and use the hashtag #30smiles

While the turmoils at home seemed to be neverending I thought that being away from it meant I was indestructible. I had started an LLM in a new city and it was intoxicating. In those years (my social years) I made friends for life, lost a few on the way but most importantly I found a way to not be me and it felt great. I was masking my sorrow with a mask no one knew about – not even me. Needless to say my social years didn’t last long – i’m a house cat at heart. So after too many jagerbombs, heartbreaks and too many late nights I buckled down, did the work and got my first masters. It felt like an accomplishment but not my own.

After this, I made the decision to stay in the UK permanently. It may sound selfish but I could never find out who I was in Cyprus; I was a child of divorce, sister to a boy with autism, wanted a career in law, but I didn’t even know basic things about myself; what food I liked, what music moved me or even how I liked to dress. Up until that point I was just faking being me trying to be the me I thought I was supposed to be.

So I cut ties with with all that, got a job and started working towards getting a training contract.

Today: I look at my brother who has lived his life so openly. No masks, no pretending – he has known who he is since the start. Who knows what mask he would be forced to wear if he was like us? What he would be forced to suppress/do just to fit in. So today, after years of mistakes and learning from my brother, i can proudly stand next to him without a mask. I don’t have peppers in my food because I don’t enjoy them, i don’t like horrors/thrillers, i prefer rain to sunshine and Pizza Hut to Dominos (that’s right), and I’d rather stay in all day and hang out with my bro (even though we annoy eachother) than go out into the world without him.

 

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21 and Atypical: The SMILE Project

64582350_2087828768006568_1085529915794653184_oThe SMILE Project is a culmination of the fears, determination and strength of the autism families in the Famagusta area in Cyprus. It was born out of fear of what will happen to our adults with autism who require care. It was created with determination to establish a safe, educational space for our kids where the state has failed. It is opening today because of the fearlessness and strength of those involved. Those who have done the manual work, donating time and money to ensure that our gentle giants do not suffer the consequences of a state that doesn’t understand them. Today, 19th June at 7:30pm in Paralimni, we open our doors to 3 young adults who pave the way to a better future for all adults with autism in Cyprus.

The Smile Project will be based in the Famagusta Area (Paralimni) and will provide day-care services for young autistic adults of 21 years old and over. 64912747_2382131665339646_8103174948933074944_nIn every autism family, there comes that dreaded time where you have to think of what’s next. Our families and Autism Support Famagusta powered through obstacles, lack of funding and the absence of support to imagine what would happen after State school comes to an end. We, the families, know that there is no provision or services with specialised staffing for young adults with autism in our area – so we needed to act.

The future of our children is a concern for all parents.
Who will take care of them?
Where will he/she live?
Will they be safe and have a quality of life when we are no longer here?

The SMILE project is a massive achievement and a stepping stone. The ultimate goal will be a 24-hour care centre with overnight stay but also a day care provision for adults on the autism spectrum. The centre will offer sensory sensitive activities tailored to each child, music therapy, speech therapy, arts and crafts etc.

Our children’s learning will not stop. We are working together towards the same goal which is to provide support to families with children on the autism spectrum.

As a group, we are blessed to have had the support of the Municipality of Ayia Napa, the Mayor, local councillors and staff every step of the way. We are hopeful and confident that other Municipalities in Cyprus will embrace and support us to pave the way to a brighter future for autism in our beautiful island.

So.. join us – all you have to do is smile.

If you want to help:

Donate here https://www.autismsupportfamagusta.com/donate-index-impact

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The Sri Lanka Diaries: 13 years later

13 years ago on 26th December 2004 we were just two kids holidaying with our parents in Sri Lanka.

13 years ago, while I was clutching onto Christos and waiting for the second tsunami wave to hit, I thought of all the things I might not be able to do. I wondered if my family knew I loved them. If we would be found. I thought of what I wanted to do, and how I would do it.

13 years later, unavoidable circumstances have led to Christos and I being on holiday in Sri Lanka alone for three days. We aren’t slumming it in the slightest. We are still staying in Amaya Lake, got a suite and all the staff doing their best to provide us will all the support we need.

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It’s not the first time we’ve been alone together. I used to be in charge when our parents were at work for 3-4 hours. But we were at home. I knew who to call; I knew what needed to be done in case of an emergency; our parents worked 15 minutes away and our grandparents lived 30 minutes away. For the last three days we have been a 3 hour drive away from dad and 5,644km away from any kind of family. No back up. And when I say no back up, I mean no back up that can take over from me with Christos. I’m the only one who knows how to make his food, what he says, what he drinks, his schedule, his expressions, his mood, how he likes his clothes, socks, showers. I’m the only one he can depend on for 3 days. I haven’t found a word that describes what it feels like yet.

In 2004 Christos was 6. He had not started speaking yet and we communicated with PECS. We had a bag packed with only his food. There was his gluten free pasta, halloumi, lemons, rice, a burner and his salt and vinegar Lays crisps. Remember, this was 2004, in a village in a third world country in the midst of a civil war. No smartphones, no internet, no roaming, no YouTube, no Lays.

Despite my stomach ache, insomnia and the permanent look of panic on my face, the three days have been a breeze. It may not sound like a long time and you might be thinking that I’m being a martyr. I assure you, I tell myself to (wo)man up constantly. We have been following a schedule for the last 11 days, and we have not deviated from it much, unless necessary. My only job is to make sure we stay on schedule.

And that nothing happens to me.

Or him. But mostly to make sure we are on schedule.

The boy who couldn’t speak or understand why we were rushing him out of the house and disrupting his schedule has been replaced by a giant who follows instructions, communicates clearly with me about what he wants and understands that he needs to behave for me. We even went to a gala dinner together! He has enchanted the staff and the other guests. He is aware that I am alone and that I need to be taken care of as well. I know he knows because I occasionally get a kiss I don’t ask for or he looks back and holds my hand. My baby brother has grown into a beautiful human and that is all I want for Christmas for the rest of my life.

Some of the difficulties we have faced these last three days include:

– Having to check the time constantly to make sure we are on time. He does this on my phone approximately every 5/7 minutes.

– Always taking the same route to the same places. I tried to vary our walks slightly and had to deal with a tantrum because of it. He adapted quickly after a stern talking to and threats to call mum.

– Constant reassurance that we are keeping to schedule. He repeats the schedule to me constantly and I have to confirm it every time, with a smile and a kiss. Even as i write this he is telling me that he will be listening to music at 17.20 at volume 50.

– Brushing teeth. I have to count to 60 so that he brushes his teeth properly.

– Exercise. I’ve only been able to convince him to take a walk with me once in the 3 days we have been here. But at least we did it!

– Stimming and echolalia in a crowded restaurant. His arm flapping and laughter or repetition turns heads but everyone has been very helpful and understanding so far.

– The volume. Of the TV, the laptop, the game boy, his voice. It’s a constant negotiation of numbers and compromise. I am amazed at how willing he is to cooperate.

On this day, 13 years later, I am content that my family knows I adore them. I am assured

img_8423-2 that whatever happens I have people in my life that will always find me. I set goals and I have accomplished most. I’ve done most of what I wanted to do and I have plans for the things I haven’t been able to do yet.

Yesterday was all about self-indulgence, presents and personal happiness. Today is about remembering and honouring the 220,000 who didn’t get the chance to do what they wanted by living out our own lives to the fullest.

No doubt our visit to Sri Lanka has been impactful. Everyone in our vicinity has been touched by autism. Everyone has learned something new. I hope this means that the next autism family to visit Amaya Lake will be in for a treat!

Be kind. Share the love.

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