Judging me, judging you.

I just finished a session on unconscious bias which was aimed at helping us understand why, despite equalities supposedly being enshrined in law, society is still so unfair. By understanding unconscious bias we can begin to frame prejudice as something we are bombarded with from the world around us and realise that only by developing our response to it can we really eliminate it.

What is unconscious bias? Our background. Our childhood. Our favourite fruit, show and personal experience with a University or a salon or a neighbourhood. Everything around us is made up of societal stereotypes and forced into cultural context because that is how we can even begin to comprehend the world around us. For example, think of these 3 words – pilot, personal assistant, 5 year old. Did you think – man, woman, neurotypical? Of course, you did. I did too.

Unconscious bias has evolved alongside our cognitive functions, our history and our own individual experience over thousands of years. Trying to fight it is helpless, but learning to accept the thought and actively choosing to change it is how we will start to shift the bias for future generations.

Let’s take a child as an example – what do you think of? A boy, probably, around 4/5 years old, maybe just started walking and playing with some sort of toy. You don’t think of an 8 year old girl struggling to spell, speak, eat, or walk – but she’s a child too. So, next time you are speaking to a parent of autism and your mind catches sight of that fictional boy hold the image and open it up. Let the parent tell you about their child’s tantrum, their dietary preferences, what they are learning in speech therapy and let those words shape the image in your mind. Holding on to the original thought means you will think – aren’t they too old for a tantrum? What kid doesn’t like chips? Shouldn’t they be doing more advanced stuff at this age?

Let’s say there’s an adult walking towards you, on his tiptoes, making grunting noises – what do you think of? A man, drunk or on drugs, probably, and it immediately triggers your defence instincts. There’s nothing wrong with this reaction because your survival instinct is too strong to manipulate – it’s been developing for millions of years. Stop judging yourself for judging people on appearance because that’s all the information you have during the split second your instinct kicks in. It’s what you do after the thought that speaks to who you are. You wouldn’t think it’s an adult with autism just walking and stimming for many, many reasons. Maybe you don’t know about autism, maybe you don’t know stimming, maybe you’ve had a hard day – but what do you do when you do realise, or when you know?

I know I use this example too often but let’s think of a busy, long flight and a screaming kid – what do you think? Probably some profanities, judging the parent who can’t ‘control’ their kid, wondering why, of all the planes in the world, it had to be this one. Well after all those thoughts, which will take about a second to form and go through your mind, remember how different we all are. Put yourself in the parent’s or the kid’s position. Maybe you know about sensory overresponsivity (from my previous post *winkwink*) or maybe you just put your headphones in.

Unconscious bias will have an impact on our decisions and actions without realising. We will relate more and offer more allowances to people we know something familiar about – like people who are from the same country or enjoy our kind of music – and we will judge people who don’t like what we think is the bomb.com, like smoked salmon or Stranger Things. We will be more inclined to learn about different abilities if we know people who have them – like autism, Downs or paraplegia – and we will be more sceptical of conditions we don’t understand – like Tourettes or palmar hyperhidrosis (clammy hands or feet).

How we react when we recognise unconscious bias is what we should noticing, passing on to others and using our experiences to shape a new image for pilot, personal assistant and 5 year old. The first step is to stop judging yourself, for judging others. The rest of the steps are up to you.

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