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An autism sister watching Atypical Season 2, Episodes 3-10

It took me a while to get through this season because it is so emotionally charged. It’s a bit too relatable for me.

Ultimately, I want you to watch it and see these 6 things.

1: In episode 3, Sam walks out of his class at some point due to sensory overload. The way he walks out reminded me of my brother. The eyes, the mouth twitching, the hand shaking, the urgency in his step. He walks out of that class as if his life depended on it. Sam has autism spectrum disorder. Keir Gilchrist, the actor, does not. Creating a single, accurate portrayal of living with ASD is impossible. Therefore, to create something relatable to as many people as you can you endeavour to make connections through different interpretations of ASD. It is a colossal credit to the people behind Atypical that Keir was able to remind little old me of my autistic brother in that scene. You can hear what he has to say about the show here, at Autfest 2018 hosted by Autism Society of America. In the same breath, we are introduced to an autism group with a range of individuals. These actors are all on the spectrum in real life. Again, they do not represent the entire autism community but they are there, on the screen with their own traits teaching all of us that autism has as many faces as the ‘normal’ cult. We see that they are honest, they have insecurities we can relate to and they care and look out for each other.

2: Doug and Elsa 44333001_353571598538233_179029183383470080_nare encouraged to promote awareness after an incident with Sam. I don’t want to state the obvious but that’s what i’m doing with this blog, that what we are going with the autism support group in Cyprus, that’s what my dad does with hiring people on the spectrum to work with. It’s not me being me when I say that our people are inspiring. As soon as they waltz into our lives they start tearing down walls, they press a reset button and draw a line between who we were and who we are meant to be. They push us out of our box, and pull us into unknown territory. They open our eyes and give us the gift of purpose.

3: Bullying. We experience Sam’s school life without Casey and although it is heartbreaking to see, watch and relate to we are also reminded that people outside our family have our kids back as well. It’s daunting for an autism family to let go and not be in control. It is nearly impossible to trust when it comes to them because of how cruel our society can be to anyone who is not neurotypical. We are reminded that they will have friends and foes wherever they go, and that their friends are capable of loving them and defending them as ferociously as we do. We experience more of the friendship between Zahid and Sam in this season. It is refreshing to see a portrayal of non-family members and how attuned they are to the needs of the person on the spectrum. It demonstrates the impact a neurodiverse person can have on everyone around them. Zahid gives as good as he takes in this friendship and when he feels he’s out of his league he calls in the big guns – Casey.

4: Sam explains that autism is not an accomplishment. It is not something he worked towards or something he has overcome. For neurotypicals it’s easy to think of someone’s progress as ‘overcoming’ their autism but that’s not an accurate observation or conclusion to make. Autism is something he was born with. Autism it’s part of his physical, genetic, cognitive and behavioural development as a person. He can’t overcome it, because he is it. To Sam, autism is like having fingers and toes. Think of it this way: Some people’s toes are long, some toes are longer than others, some are tiny. Some fingers bend to the left or the right, some have big nail  surfaces some barely have any. No two toes or fingers in the world are the same which means that there are 7.6 billion different pairs of toes in the world. Some people can bend make different shapes with their fingers, some can paint with their toes. Some are ambidextrous, some don’t have all ten.  Who’s to say what a persons abilities are based on their fingers and toes?

5: Casey – Which I talk about extensively here.

6: It is painfully obvious how immense and substantial the research was when the concept of Atypical was cooked up.  The crew, the directors, the writers and the actors show us in every single episode that they are trying to understand all the hundreds of layers that exist beneath the surface of an autism family. Every member is their own person. They don’t have the answers, they don’t do everything right because an autism diagnosis doesn’t come with a manual. Their characters are not superficially drawn up scripts that react to autism. Not all their decisions or actions relate to the person with autism. Each member is a complex human being, who struggles with their insecurities, their past, their future, their friendships/relationships, and autism. They are deeply relatable and painfully real.

Bonus tip: It’s so so worth watching.

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An autism sister watching Atypical Season 2, Episode 2

I’m only going to talk about Casey (the sister) in this post. I want you to see her the way I see her.  I want you to see through her to all the sisters out there.

42877323_986385234880394_644448336547414016_nThe sister at home – Champion. She is the neurotypical child. She is the one that outed her mum. She is a good student, and a sought after athlete.

She is attuned with her surroundings and the needs of every member of her family. She blames herself when the marriage is put in jeopardy, when Sam finds out and tries to keep normalcy when Sam needs it the most. She takes on responsibilities no one has assigned her with. No one in her family expects her to be all these things, to think of all the implications and consequences. Her thoughts and needs take a back seat because she is the neurotypical, she is the one that has to be there while the parents sort out their own stuff. There’s no time for her emotional distress because she has to step up for every other member in their family. Plus, no one asked how she was dealing with her parent’s problems or in her new school – her champion mask is impenetrable.

The sister at old school – Shield: Everyone knows that you do not mess with Casey and Sam. Sam continues coping at school without Casey because of the foundations she has laid in previous years. It is expected that there will be repercussions when it comes to Sam, and no one wants to take that risk with her. I’m getting ahead of myself but in Episode 3, a fellow pupil accidentally does something to Sam and she says to him “Tell Casey I didn’t mean it”. Her shield mask is impactful.

The sister at new school – Timid. We haven’t seen this side of Casey yet. Mostly because she is so assertive in all her other roles. She is outside her comfort-zone. No one knows her as Sam’s sister here – they know her as an athlete, they will get to know her as Casey. It’s hard for her to readjust and define herself as her own person. She resorts to funny remarks and sarcasm almost every opportunity she gets while she is at the new school. Like I mentioned above, no one in her family has asked how her first few days at school have been – not on screen anyway. That’s not something that just hasn’t been addressed in the script, that’s how it really is in life.

On her first day she had a brought prepared lunch from home, on her second day she has to survive on peanuts and on the third day someone offers her a helping hand (whether it’s a good idea or not is irrelevant). She grabs it because she needs to be taken care of. Do you see how inspired this analogy is? It’s a representation of all the crap she has to deal with in the last few days narrated in food, the thing that sustains us.

Instead of crumbling she picks herself up and watches the penguin cam with her brother. She doesn’t even see herself as being in need of support or comfort. She deals and returns to what’s important. She doesn’t take the compliment from her dad calling her a ‘good kid’ because the things she does, and the support she offers comes is who she is. It’s not fake, it’s not something she has to think of; it’s not for a reward. She has to find her Casey mask.

*End*

As an autism sister, it’s was impossible for me to define myself or to get to know myself when i was growing up. Family break ups and autism drowned out my noise. I never had the chance to sit down and think “Right, this is what I want; this is what I like; this is what I don’t like”. My teenage years were me moulding myself to what I thought my family needed.

I moved away because I thought that’s what I needed to do so I could offer my brother the best future I could. I did law because I thought it would make me financially stable for my brother. I did an MA because I thought that’s what was expected of me. And my relationships and friendships? Well.

In the last two years, I have gotten to know myself . I spend more time with me, I know what films I like – not because my friends like them. I know what music I want to listen to – not because it’s popular. I know what books I like to read – not because they’re bestsellers. I used to drink beer because we were at a pub or eat beef because steak is  ‘the best’. I’d go out every time people had plans without any regard to what I wanted, I’d watch all the blockbusters, listen to all the hits and pretend that I didn’t have a care in the world because no one likes a downer.

Now I know that I don’t want to be a solicitor, I don’t like beef, I can tell people I disagree without the crippling fear that they won’t like me anymore. 12 years down the line, I bagged myself a blind date with me.

It’s hard for any teen to figure out who they are. Add a break up and autism in the mix and things get even worse.

When you look at Casey, or an autism family, look beyond the autism cloak. They are still humans, flawed, broken, tired, brave, and sometimes inspirational humans. When you watch Atypical, read between the scripted lines.

Casey is the single most inspiring female character I have watched in the last few years. I hope you see her through my eyes and that you let her teach you about autism, family and love.

After the trauma of the first episode, i’m ready to binge. I’ll let you know when i come up for air. 😊